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Today's News

  • Clark wedding

    Linda Susan DeBakey and Allen Tomas Clark were married Saturday, May 12, 2012, at Highland Baptist Church in Shelbyville.

    The bride is the daughter of Douglas DeBakey of Houston, Texas, and Claire Kuperberg DeBakey of Columbia, Md. The groom is the son of Rev. Allen P. and Ana Clark of Shelbyville.

    The bride and the groom are both graduates of the University of the Cumberlands (2011/2012),  and Fred Cummings, the university’s associate professor of religion, was the presiding minister at the double-ring service.

  • Whiplash plays at Abbey Road on the River

  • Shelby County School Board: ‘Tighter’ budget could get worse

    The Shelby County school board approved a bleak budget on Thursday, although it balances, and according to Greg Murphy, the district director of finance, it could get worse.

    “I think last year I used the term razor thin, and this year it’s even tighter,” Murphy told the board in his report. “The budget balances, and our revenue exceeds our expenses, barely.

    “And the next two years could be even more difficult. The second year of the biennium has the potential to be very, very difficult.”

  • Diploma program showing results

    Shelby County Board of Education meetings are rarely as crowded and as uplifting as Thursday’s edition.

    The boardroom at the district’s offices, 1155 Main Street in Shelbyville, was packed with smiling faces despite the looming budget discussion that was on the agenda.

    But before the board and administration could get knee deep in figures they were presented with an early graduation candidate, one that has shown as much or more perseverance than those that will line up at Shelby County and Collins high schools this coming weekend.

  • Shelbyville plugging spot with help from county, state

    The city of Shelbyville has been forced to stop inspecting new construction after former Building Inspector and Chief Code Enforcement Officer Jeff Tennill left his position.

    Tennill recently had missed work for a few long stretches of time because of illness, and he could not be reached for comment.

    The empty position leaves the city without a building inspector, but Darrell Willard has remained as the city’s code enforcement officer, dealing with local code enforcement.

  • They play a new and different game on old field of dreams

    The line drive whistled off the pink bat toward third base, where it scattered the dust when it landed untouched by a fielder. The batter took off toward first base, where a coach was encouraging a runner already there to move along toward second.

    The little hitter stopped at first, and as each successive hitter made contact and followed her, she kept shuttling around the bases, until, after she crossed home, she headed back to first base, where she was detoured by the coach and told she could sit down.

  • What we think: What will you learn this week?

    We know there can be bureaucratic answers to many questions that befuddle us about why things are the way they are, but that does not preclude our asking one question we suspect is on the minds of many this week:
    Why are students in school from now through June 4? Because they are required by state law to have 1062 hours – about 177 days – of “instruction.”

    But we question whether there is any real instruction being given on these last few days.

  • We congratulate: Those students who return to finish

    There are inspirational stories at the end of every school year, tales of students, young and old, who have persevered, diligently fought against odds and overcome adversity.

    In fact, to the dictum of having students “college and career ready” – which we embrace wholeheartedly – we add these examples of students who leave school “life ready.”

  • George N. Busey: 1923-2012

    If you knew George N. Busey, maybe lived near him in Bagdad or interacted with him in the myriad ways he affected Shelby County, then you almost assuredly share today in the sense of loss felt by so many.

    Busey, a longtime farmer known far and wide for his civic mindedness, his love of his community and his character, died Sunday. He was 88.

  • MY WORD: This fight against cancer has incredible allies

    Every day is Cancer Awareness. Cancer is a 365-day, 24/7 kind of carnivore. It is not selecting on whom it will prey. My husband is a two-time survivor. When life is lived by simple pleasures, the enemy can attack. Life as you know it is forever changed. Attached is an open letter to Gary’s physician.