Today's News

  • Getting the show on the road

    When children head out to school next week, school officials will make sure they get there in safety and comfort, they say.

    Transportation Coordinator George Blakeman said Shelby County School’s fleet of 86 buses would be ready to hit the road

    That preparation has involved a lot of work, not only with making sure buses are ready, but also coordinating bus routes, getting drivers and bus monitors in place, as well checking out existing equipment and getting new technology installed on buses, said Blakeman.

  • Men’s Health Fair is Saturday

    Each year men pour in by the hundreds to Jewish Hospital Shelbyville for the Men’s Health Fair and this year organizers anticipate an even greater turnout.

    “We had about two-hundred men last year but we are expecting more this year,” said Noble Roberts, who serves on the planning committee for the event.

    “I went to ninety-five businesses and handed out brochures,” he said, explaining that he hoped his promoting efforts would draw more participants.

  • Breaking bread

    A downtown Shelbyville Church well known for feeding the hungry will finally be back at it on Monday.

    Church personnel affiliated with God’s Kitchen, operated by Victory Baptist, say they are glad to hear that news.

    “The churches are so excited about this – I was so surprised when I started contacting them. They are all so happy to be back,” said Susie Stivers, who heads up the ministry along with Alicia Cardwell.

  • SHELBYVILLE CITY COUNCIL – Tax rate to be discussed

    The Shelbyville City Council will discuss the tax rate for 2015 when they convene Thursday at 6:30 p.m. at city hall, 315 Washington Street.

    City Clerk Inez Harris said as of Tuesday afternoon they were uncertain if the rate would change.

    “We don’t know what the tax rate is at this time,” she said. “We are working that up right now.”

    Mayor Tom Hardesty agreed that the taxes are still being worked up but hopes the rate will remain unchanged.

  • Finishing what SCPS started

    In Shelby County, we reap what we sow, and not just in the fields.  Shelby County Public Schools has done an amazing job over the years in producing a bountiful harvest of students and those seeds are often replanted back into our school system.

    This year three of the districts four new principals are graduates of Shelby County High School, including newly appointed SCHS principal Margo Whisman.

  • The cost of education

    Back-to-school shopping is a financially plaguing problem for many. So last month Shelby County Public Schools Superintendent James Neihof suggested parents restrict their supply list spending at $25.

    And while the cap is helpful, it is just a drop in the bucket for many parents when it comes to back-to-school shopping, which is now considered the second largest spending season next to the winter holidays.

  • Shelby Prevention to host first Resource Fair

    Shelby Prevention is hosting the community’s first Resource Fair with a goal of providing information on health insurance, hospitals, the health department’s long and short term substance abuse treatment options, counseling, outpatient services, school resources, and youth involvement opportunities, as well as other resources in the community available concerning drug and alcohol abuse.

    Shelby Prevention Director Kelly McNew explained that the fair is in response to common concerns posed by the community.

  • Epic Crabtree legacy lives on through Hero

    The 2015 Shelbyville Horse Show will go down in the books as one of the most memorable and impressive since its establishment 26 years ago.

    Dedicated to the late Charles “Redd” Crabtree, this year’s show honored the famous trainer with another win.

    Crabtree may be gone, but his legacy lives on, as a former Crabtree-trained horse earned the title of 2015 Five Gaited Stake Grand Champion.

    “He had been in training with Redd Crabtree when he passed away,” horse show manager R.H. Bennett said.

  • Storm wreaks havoc with horse show

    The 26th Annual Shelbyville Horse Show opened with a bang Wednesday night, not from the horses, but from Mother Nature.

    Half an hour before the show was scheduled to begin — with socializing, eating and drinking already well underway — skies darkened rapidly, and wind began to whip tablecloths, skirts and hairpieces.

    The situation had the potential to be a serious situation, said Pam Ray, one of the event’s main organizers.

  • Smoke from mixing center causes concern

    After a complaint from concerned citizens generated an investigation into a source of smoke coming from a business, state officials say there is no cause for concern.

    “They didn’t find any violations; they went and checked it out, and they didn’t find anything, and you have the documents to show that,” said Lanny Brannock, communications officer for the Division of Air Quality, a department within the Energy and Environmental Cabinet.