.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's News

  • Students improving, MAP shows

    Halfway through the school year, most students in Shelby County are performing at grade level in reading and math.

    That’s what school officials reported to the Shelby County Board of Education at Thursday’s meeting, based on the winter segment of the Measured Academic Progress tests students take three times each year.

  • Construction team at SCHS builds a winning concept

    When they begin the downstairs renovation at Shelby County High School, they may want to look in-house for a few ideas.

    The Rocket Construction team – comprised of B.J. Tingle, John Tingle, Dustin Casey, David Lee and Brandon Seaman – put together a plan and presentation for building a National Association of Home Builders Green Building Standards, silver-level home and earned third place in the Residential Construction Management Competition hosted by the NAHB.

  • This Odyssey can be odd, you see

    OK, you have one minute to think about this problem, and you can't talk to anyone else about it: Make a rhyme using a name or species of an animal. For example, "I think mice are nice." Or "there's a cat in the hat."

    The more creative the response, the more points awarded.

    You have two minutes to respond.

    Not so easy is it?

    This is just one practice Spontaneous Response question that Odyssey of the Mind participants may use leading up to their competition.

  • Farmer’s menu at luncheon: basketball, politics

    Builders and realtors who had lunch at Claudia Sanders on Tuesday were treated to more than just chicken.

    They listened to a Republican candidate for lieutenant governor – and outgoing agriculture commissioner – Richie Farmer talk about three topics near to the hearts of Kentuckians: basketball, farming and politics.

    Farmer talked a lot about the first subject, a little about the second, and only briefly touched upon the last in his address a meeting of  the Home Builders Association of Louisville’s Shelby County council.

  • Shelby County Grand Jury Indictments

    Jerry R. Ford of 612 10th St. in Shelbyville was indicted on five counts of second-degree burglary.
    Ryan C. Curtsinger, of 637 Bayne Avenue in Shelbyville was indicted for theft of a legend drug, first offense.
    Ricky D. Thompson of 5542 Frankfort Road in Shelbyville was indicted for second-degree assault and fourth-degree assault.
    James C. Warner of 375 Railroad Lane in Clay was indicted for flagrant non-support.
    James C. Wills of 615 10th St. No. 1 in Shelbyville was indicted for fourth-degree assault, two times or more within five years, and violation of a protective order.

  • KSP seeking man for identity theft

    The Kentucky State Police Frankfort Post 12 is seeking assistance in locating Antionne W. Whitlock, who is wanted in Franklin County on seven counts of theft of identity and seven counts of theft.
    “The suspect [Whitlock] used his former roommate’s personal information to transfer a large amount of money from the victim’s checking account to his account,” KSP Trooper Ron Turley said.
    Whitlock, 29, is described as a black male, 5 feet, 9 inches tall and weighing 150 pounds, with brown eyes and black hair.

  • F-3 storm just misses Shelby

    Pounding rain, high winds, thunder and lightning – and even a nearby tornado – brought a taste of August to the last morning of February as severe weather roared across Shelby County during early morning hours.

    Shelby County Road Supervisor Carl Henry said winds gusted to 100 miles per hour and struck northern Shelby County hard, as a tornado touched down just a thousand feet north of the county line in Henry County, where two houses were destroyed.

  • How a guy terrified of tornadoes has found a scary new calm

    Maybe it’s a statement about complacency, laziness or just a bit of “the-sky-is-falling” syndrome – literally – that I didn’t leap to the computer or TV Monday morning when it felt like the side of my house was going to be sent blasting into Franklin County.

    Many of you were awake, alert and ever vigilant to your family’s safety, but all I did was lie there and hope that the siding would stay put and wonder if the dripping I heard was from the ceiling and not the gutter (neither happened).

  • What we think: We need you to help best of our best

    We were struck both sad and concerned when we heard that the Pflughaupt Scholarship, the largest benefactor for students in Shelby County for the past 15-plus years, is about to run out of money.

    The generosity of Gene and Margery Pflughaupt has been unmatched in helping the best of the best in Shelby County find their paths to the treasure trough of education.

    They stepped in when the O. L. Moore Scholarship, a smaller version that had helped students since the 1960s, ran its course in 1995.

  • We congratulate: Latest good news for our industries

    More good economic news arrived Thursday when state economic development officials approved tax incentives for expansion projects at Katayama American Co. and Shelby Industries.

    On top of the hot fudge sundae that was the earlier announcement at Martinrea Heavy Stamping, these are two plump and tasty cherries.

    That the companies received the incentives and will add, between them, more than 30 new jobs in the next year is wonderful news. These are opportunities for workers who have lost their jobs or maybe looking for new opportunities.