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Today's News

  • Rockets face another ranked opponent

    Another week, another Top 10 opponent for the Shelby County football team.

    Last Friday night it was Anderson County, which is tied for ninth in this week’s Associated Press Top 10 poll in Class 5A. Tonight the Rockets host No. 8 Jeffersontown at 7:30 p.m. in their first home game of the season.

    Shelby County is looking to rebound from last week’s lopsided loss (58-20) to the Bearcats against a faster, and maybe even more formidable foe.

  • Shelby County School Board: Plans for Southside open for public view

    The public will get its first chance to critique, comment and opine on the new Southside Elementary School at a public forum Tuesday.

    The forum, which will be at 7 p.m. at Southside, will begin with the presentation of the draft plan, which likely will have been fine-tuned by the board at yesterday's meeting in their workshop.

    After that, those members of the public that have signed in will be allowed to speak on the project.

  • Kicking ‘til the very end

    It was a cool, drizzly Wednesday night, and her team trailed Oldham County, 9-0, with less than 10 minutes to play, but Shelby County senior Alex Patterson was still trying.

    Trying to get to the ball, trying to make a run up the field, trying to get a goal.

    But that’s Patterson, the hard-playing, fleet-footed, goal-gobbling, diminutive senior forward for the Rockets’ girls’ soccer team. 

  • 9-11 not a big part of school curriculum yet

    Things have certainly changed.

    The world is definitely a different place.

    But do we continue to learn, 10 years after the tragedy of Sept. 11, 2001?

    Students and teachers, no doubt, took time to discuss the matter in school this week. Maybe it was a small part of a lesson, maybe it was a whole class, but the events of that day do not appear to have worked their way into the fabric of U.S. and world history classes like D-day or the bombing of Pearl Harbor.

  • Teacher facing sex charges has resigned

    Shannon Hirchert, the Collins high school teacher who has pleaded not guilty to six counts of first-degree sexual abuse involving two students, resigned from her position as a special needs teacher last month.

    Despite Superintendent James Neihof's statement at the school district's press conference when Hirchert was arrested that "charges are not conclusive of guilt," Hirchert resigned on Aug. 5, just two days after her arrest.

    Neihof confirmed the resignation and added that it was "voluntary" and not asked for by the district.

  • Shelby is hot stop on tourists’ maps

    Visitors have spent a lot of tourism dollars in Shelby County this  past year, tourism officials say, but not for the primary reason you might think.

    Katie Fussenegger, executive director of the Shelbyville/Shelby County Visitors Bureau, said that more than 500 more tourists stayed in town during 2011 but not necessarily to see the county’s attractions, although the Shelbyville Horse Show always draws a lot of visitors.

  • Shelby County Grand Jury Indictments Sept. 9, 2011

    Brandon L. Pham, 27, of 45 Harmony Court was indicted for first-degree criminal abuse, first-degree sexual abuse, intimidating a witness in a legal process, fourth-degree assault, and possession of marijuana.

    Charles Johnson, 33, of 537 Birchwood Circle was indicted for being a convicted felon in possession of a firearm, complicity to first-degree burglary and being a persistent felony offender.

    Daniel P. Burkhammer, 26, of 10606 E. Pavilion Way No. 1 in Louisville was indicted for first-degree arson.

  • County passes 1st OK for new district plan

    Magistrates expressed satisfaction Tuesday night with the way their districts have been re-aligned to balance out the population growth of the past 10 years and passed a first reading on an ordinance to set those new boundaries.

  • 9-11 is the day we all stood still

    The threads we have woven together in the 10 years since terrorists stole commercial airliners and flew them into the World Trade Center, the Pentagon and, with help, a field in Pennsylvania form a yarn that stretches across generations.

    We look back, and those of us who saw what happened, saw those Twin Towers pierced by jets, saw them one by one crumble and fall as if they were a child’s toys and not man-made spires, feel that yarn wrap around us with a tension that won’t ever quite ease up, even after days, weeks and years and – now – a decade.

  • EARLIER: Shelby County says no to further input on zoning decision

    A crowd of about 30 showed up at the Stratton Center on Tuesday night to see how county officials would handle a proposed zone change for Kentucky Street.

    But those residents left the Shelby County Fiscal Court meeting without getting a chance to voice their opinions about a proposed zone change that would allow a scrap metal business to locate next to Red Orchard Park on Kentucky Street.