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Today's News

  • Gay marriage almost Legal in Kentucky

    Although a federal judge ruled in favor of gay marriage in Kentucky Tuesday, same-sex couples still will not be allowed in marry in the commonwealth until all appeals are dealt with.

    In striking down Kentucky's ban on gay marriage, U.S. District Judge John G. Heyburn II rejected Gov. Steve Beshear's argument that the state’s ban on the practice is necessary because only heterosexual couples can procreate and maintain the state's birth rate and economy.

    "These arguments are not those of serious people," Heyburn wrote in his opinion.

  • Efforts ongoing to circulate petition for wet/dry election

    A few weeks ago, Katie Sjothun took on the daunting task of gathering thousands of signatures for a wet/dry election in the interest of what she considered to be ‘fair’ for the good of Shelby County.

    Now, with most of the red tape behind her, she said she is getting more excited than ever about the prospect of completing the task – collecting nearly 4,700 signatures for her petition.

  • Harsh winter didn’t stop pests

    Dinners on the patio, gardening, swimming in the pool and taking a quiet walk are all wonderful ways to enjoy summertime in Shelbyville; they are also excellent ways to get mosquito bites.

    While you may think the mosquitoes are worse than ever, University of Kentucky extension entomologist Lee Townsend explained that at the beginning of each mosquito season people often tend to think that way.

    “They shock us every summer,” he said, explaining that the number of mosquitoes has not increased from previous years.

  • Costs prohibit SCPS from offering free lunches

    It’s an unfortunate yet accurate fact that many children go throughout their school day with an empty and growling stomach.

    But for many students across America, those tummies are being tamed, thanks to The Community Eligibility Option, a reform from the Healthy, Hunger Free Kids Act, signed by President Barack Obama in 2010.

    The program provides school lunches at no charge to all students at participating schools, regardless of the family’s income.

  • Simpsonville City Commission: Police, city, outlet officials working on traffic plans

    Simpsonville city officials are beginning to make plans for the opening of the new Outlet Shoppes of the Bluegrass on July 30-31.

  • Peytona area getting new water tower

    Construction began last week on a long-awaited new water tower for the Clay Village/Peytona area.

    The new tower is the first such structure to be constructed in that area for more than half a century, Magistrate Eddie Kingsolver said during Tuesday night’s meeting of the Shelby County Fiscal Court.

    He added that it will provide much better water service for that portion of the county.

    “There will be a lot better water pressure,” he said.

  • Picking up some holiday boom

    For those last minute Independence Day shoppers scrambling for celebration necessities like potato salad and hotdog buns, don’t forget to stop by one of the many tents throughout the area to stock up on fireworks.

    While many stands say there are no special discounts for the holiday, most assured that their prices would not increase with the demand, either.

    “We don’t really do specials,” said Jason Baker, area manager for TNT fireworks.

  • Paul sets up platform at Rotary luncheon

    About 100 showed up for Tuesday’s Shelbyville Rotary club meeting to hear U.S. Sen. Rand Paul (R-Bowling Green) speak about several topics, including immigration reform, criminal justice, minimized government influence in the private sector and his ideas on how to bring more money into the U.S. economy.

  • Large crowd shows for Rabb ceremony

    A Shelby County family that made great strides for African-Americans has finally received an honor that was long overdue.

    On Tuesday, a historical marker was placed in front of the house of Dr. Maurice F. Rabb, Sr., his wife Mrs. Jewel Miller Rabb and their son Dr. Maurice F. Rabb, Jr. once called home nearly 70 years ago. Both Dr. Rabb Sr. and Mrs. Rabb were active in the NAACP and Dr. Rabb Jr. went on to become the first African-American student at the University of Louisville and in the university’s medical school.

  • Springate appointed to empty district judge seat; Gov. Beshear makes appointment in first few days of 60 day window

    Betty Springate, of Lawrenceburg, was sworn in as Division IDistrict Court Judge for the 53rd District, serving Anderson, Shelby and Spencer counties, Monday afternoon.

    Springate's appointment marks the first time in 30 years a district court judge resided in Anderson County.

    “It’s an honor to serve Anderson, Shelby and Spencer counties,” said Springate. “It’s an honor for Anderson County, for even a short period of time, to have their own judge.”