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Today's News

  • Wild and wooly weekend

    Shelby County residents can get out and take a close-up view of their agricultural neighbors, as the fifth annual Good Neighbors Farm Tour returns Saturday.

    The event will encompass 9 farms, with agricultural activity from racehorses and livestock to wine making and honeybee and wool production, with plenty of opportunity to buy homemade products.

    You’ll even be able to taste fresh farm products ranging from the sweet ice cream and honey to fresh vegetables and fruit wine to savory pork, lamb and beef.

  • TRIPLE S PLANNING COMMISSION - Proposed gas station in Waddy pushes to 2 meetings

    With several hot topics on the agenda, the Triple S Planning Commission has elected to schedule two meetings back-to-back this month, rather than risk overcrowding the room.

  • Reading between the lines

    If you like nothing better than relaxing with a good book, then the upcoming Bookfest is right down your alley.

    Deloris Odenweller, an organizer of the yearly event, glanced around Wednesday at mounds of books lining the walls at The Sentinel-News, where for weeks people have been dropping off books to donate to the event, which will be Oct. 12-14.

  • Emergency call

    With the terror of Hurricane Irma now past, Floridians are struggling to recover from the devastation that left more than half the state’s residents without power and many city streets underwater – and five Shelby Countians will be on hand to help.

    Kentucky Emergency Medical Services Director Mike Poynter said they are paramedics who were chosen to be included in a massive recovery effort involving several states.

  • Grand dedication

    Officials said that about 100 people turned out Friday night for the dedication of the new pavilion in Simpsonville.

    “It was, really a re-dedication of Wiche Park with the new pavilion replacing the old gazebo,” said Simpsonville City Administrator David Eaton, who officiated at the event.

    “A lot of the Wiche family was there,” he said, adding that the crowd also including city, county and state officials, including Simpsonville City Commissioners.

    The $137,000 gazebo replaces the old one, which was built in 1997.

  • Sisters write book together

    When America and Emma Nandez were growing up together in Mexico, neither one dreamed that one day they would be living in foreign countries and become published authors.

    The two sisters left their native Mexico 10 years ago, when they married, one going to Norway and the other to the United States.

  • Youth program coordinator says offenses down

    A year and a half after creating the position of youth coordinator, with the goal being keep more kids from getting into brushes with the law, county officials say they are seeing results.

    Shelby County Youth Coordinator Mitchell Tinsley, Mitchell, a 1989 graduate of Shelby County High School with an extensive background in working with trouble youth, gave a presentation at Tuesday night’s meeting of the Shelby County Fiscal Court to update magistrates on activities he has been engaged in since being appointed to that position in April 2016.

  • Cox appointed new Shelby County Jailer

    For the first time in two decades, the Shelby County Detention Center has a new face at the helm.

    Darrell Cox, a former captain at the detention center, has been selected to take the reins upon the retirement of longtime jailer Bobby Waits.

    Shelby County Judge-Executive Dan Ison said that Cox began his new position Sept. 1.

    "He took over at midnight on the first, I swore him in," he said.

    The ceremony, fittingly, took place at the detention center where Cox was accompanied by his wife, Carol, and daughters, Misty and Miranda.

  • Blessings for all

    Centenary United Methodist has found a new way to share its blessings in Shelbyville, by placing them in a box downtown.

    In what church members have described as a take what you need, leave what you can scenario, the church has placed a modest sized box next to the church on the building's Washington Street side featuring personal items, food, clothes and more.

    "It's right across the street from the county judge's office, it's impossible to miss," said Pastor Willard Knipp.

  • Digging up history

    Books and movies fill kids hearts with a fantasy of venturing into distant lands on a wild hunt to find a priceless treasure.  But for Brody Truhett, that dream became reality in his own backyard over the weekend.

    His mother Christina Truhett said Brody, a first grade student at Simpsonville Elementary, was carefully combing the ground with a metal detector larger than himself, just as he has done nearly ever weekend since his grandfather gifted him the yard sale find a few months ago, when he unearthed his biggest find yet.