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Today's News

  • Bookfest opens Thursday

    Shelbyville’s largest literacy event gets underway Thursday with the annual Bookfest, the used book sale hosted by The Sentine-News and the Shelby County Community Theater.

    The groups have collected so many books this year – and of such a wide variety – that organizers say that if anyone has any more books to donate, they should keep them for next year's sale.

    "Just save them," community theatre member and Bookfest organizer Deloris Odenweller said with a chuckle. "We've got plenty of books."

  • Kroger’s fresh changes

    Shelby County residents have long expressed a desire for a grocery store that caters to the healthy eaters, stores like Whole Foods or Trader Joes.

    Though it seems there are no plans on the horizon for a new brand to hit the county, Kroger has stepped up to the plate to meet those customers’ needs.

    Signs across the store have announced an ongoing remodel and store manager Marie Otto said the change will allow for the expansion of their natural food selection, which currently only encompasses a few of isles.

  • Whooping cough is on the rise in Kentucky

     The coos and giggles of an infant bring a wealth of joyous emotions for a new mom.   But when strange sounds are emitted from the lungs of that little one, those emotions can turn to fear and concern.

    And right now, especially, that concern has justification as the Louisville Department of Public Health and Wellness recently reported a dramatic spike in pertussis cases in infants. At least six cases where reported last month alone.

  • Old memories, new dreams

    “I took a deep sigh of relief when it came down just the way it was supposed to,” said Shelby County Building Inspector Tony Kelley, glancing at the rubble of the community gym in Martinsville.

    “It was pretty close to Miss Mattie’s house,” he said with a grin at Mattie Bray, who had been watching the demolition of the structure, located only a few feet from her home in Martinsville.

  • Flu Season underway

    It’s flu season again, and health officials, both at the state and local level, say that though they can’t make any predictions yet on how that will play out, they urge people to get vaccinated.

    “We are very early into this year's flu season,” said Beth Fisher, public information officer for the Cabinet for Health and Family Services.

  • County appoints new deputy EMA director

    Shelby County's emergency management agency staff will grow by one this month with the appointment of a new deputy director.

    At Tuesday night's meeting of the Shelby County Fiscal Court, magistrates appointed Jamie Pryor to the position at an annual rate of $50,000.

    Pryor, who will begin his new position Monday, is currently a supervisor at Shelby County's 911 Dispatch center. He will continue to act as telecommunicator along with his new position until a replacement can be found for him at 911 Dispatch.

  • Grant will help preserve old records

    Shelby County Clerk Sue Carole Perry pulled a huge, heavy book full of wills from residents dating from 1800s from its niche on a shelf in her records room.

    "Just look at this," she said, tracing a line from the will of a Shelby County resident who died in 1847.

    The document listed everything the man had bequeathed to his next of kin, down to kitchen items, livestock and even slaves.

    And now she has the opportunity to keep these books in preserved so they can be study as historical documents for another 200 years.

  • A road formerly traveled

    If you’ve driven down 3rd Street recently, you might have some complaints about the condition.  But recent work to the area serves as a reminder that our travels are a lot smoother than they used to be.

    Shelbyville City Engineer/Public Works Director Jennifer Herrell said while contractors were making some repairs to the road, they unearthed a 16-foot log that was once part of an old wooden roadway, called a corduroy road.

  • Accountability results unveiled

    Across the state, districts are reviewing their state KPREP results and this year in Shelby County Superintendent James Neihof has no qualms in announcing his displeasure with what he’s seen.

  • SHELBY COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD - Board approves balanced working budget

     District director of finance, Susan Barkley presented to the Shelby County school board members a balanced working budget when they convened Thursday evening for their second regularly scheduled September meeting.

    Barkley noted based on various changes from the Tentative Budget approved in May, working budget receipts exceeded expenditures by just more than $400,000.

    She opened her presentation by sharing those changes, which include:

    §  Certified assessments and tax rates

    §  SEEK revenues