Today's News

  • Mulberry peaches on tap

    Louisville based Against the Grain Brewery, along with Ethereal Brewing of Lexington, teamed up with Shelby County’s Mulberry Orchard to introduce the first limited edition brew in their Kentucky Proud Beer Series.

    Using peaches from the local farm, the brewery team brewed a sour peach saison they have named Peach Better Have My Money.

  • Shelby water tests below concerned chemical levels


    The Environmental Working Group, a public health advocacy group, released last month the results of an analysis of federal data from nationwide drinking water tests that revealed a carcinogenic chemical called chromium-6, contaminates water supplies for more than 200 million Americans in all 50 states.

    The compound name is recognizable from its mentioning in the movie “Erin Brockovich.”

  • Charter school legislation gets push


    While 43 states have legislation in place allowing charter schools, Kentucky is not one of them, but Gov. Matt Bevin, with the backing of his new appointees, is working to change that.

    Wednesday at the Kentucky Board of Education’s regular meeting in Frankfort, Bevin and his team urged the Kentucky Board of Education to call a work session in November in order to develop a position on charter school legislation.

  • Big voter turnout predicted

    “We had fifty-point-nine percent in the last presidential election; usually it’s about sixty [percent],” said Sue Carole Perry, Shelby County clerk. She explained that when a president is running for a second term voter turn out is not as great, which was the case in 2012.

  • A family ready to fight for each other

    Norma Bailey is celebrating more than her birthday today – she’s celebrating life. 

    Two years after having a double mastectomy, she has bounced back stronger than ever, but says she couldn’t have done it without her awesome support system of her husband and six kids, four of which are adopted.  She knew something was wrong in the spring of 2014, she said, when she felt a burning pain in her chest that wouldn’t go away, and when she went to have it checked out, she got the news that every women fear: breast cancer. 

  • Shelby man dies in Las Vegas jail altercation

    A Shelbyville man died Saturday after being beaten by another inmate in a Las Vegas jail, according to officials at the Clark County Coroner’s office.

    Jeremiah Bowling, 25, died of blunt force trauma at 6:12 p.m. officials said.

    Franklin Sharp, 33, has been arrested and charged with murder in the death. Sharp is said to have been Bowling’s cellmate.

    A corrections officer found Bowling bleeding from his head in his cell Saturday afternoon he was later pronounced dead.

    The motive is believed to have stemmed from an argument.

  • Google Fiber not reaching into Simpsonville

    Simpsonville officials have said that so far, despite working with officials in Jefferson County, Google Fiber has not approached them to negotiate to provide broadband internet service to the community.

    Though being located near the Jefferson/Shelby county line may seem like a logical motivation for Google Fiber to move into the community, Simpsonville city Administrator David Eaton said that no one from the company has reached out to them.

    “We haven’t heard anything from Google Fiber,” he said.

  • Wild Game Feast Saturday at Fairgrounds

    If you're wild about venison and other game, you won't want to miss Saturday's Wild Game Feast set for 6 p.m. at the Shelby County Fairgrounds.

    The annual event, a fundraiser for the youth and children's outreach at Centenary United Methodist Church, will include dinner, a silent auction and entertainment, for $15 per person at Floral Hall, with a special price of $35 for a family of two adults and two children.

    The event began more than 15 years ago, established by hunters with extra game on hand.

  • Treasure trove of history

    If you love learning about historic architecture, a newly published book will give you much more than you bargained for.

    Historic Architecture of Shelby County, Kentucky, 1792 – 1915, by John David Myles, is a hard cover, 300-page exploration of the structures built in the county during that time period, featuring more than 500 images.

  • SCPS leads the way

    As the Project Lead the Way state conference started at Collins High School on Monday, it was Shelby County Public Schools that was front and center actually leading the way.

    “They asked us to host because of the growth in Project Lead the Way, math and sciences in Shelby County,” said John Leeper, SCPS director of innovation and college and career readiness. “We have over 250 people here today [Monday] – teachers and students and vendors and business and community members that are interested in Project Lead The Way.”