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Today's News

  • Fun on the farm

    The leaves on some trees were just beginning to turn subtle shades of crimson and yellow on Saturday, creating a perfect backdrop for a crisp fall day of lazy family fun for the entire community.

    The Good Neighbors Farm Tour was in its 5th year this past weekend and those who participated in the self-guided tour of nine local farms said they couldn’t remember a more enjoyable tour. 

  • Paving the way for safety

     

  • SHELBY COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD - Board approves 4 percent tax hike

     In a 3-2 split decision, the Shelby County school board members elected ultimately to adopt an increased property tax rate of .731 up from the current .715 per $100 of assessed value.

    The meeting opened with a public hearing on the matter and while no members of the community were present to speak for or against the proposed change, board members did not come to their decision lightly.

  • Town hall talk on pensions

     Across the state, those who dedicate their lives to serving our communities are facing the challenge of an uncertain future with their retirement plans.

    The PFM Consulting Group, which was hired by the state, offered recommendations last month for Kentucky's pension systems that could save the state more than $1 billion a year.

    However, those recommendations have left many concerned, including members of the Shelby County Education Association.

  • Reprising a family role in history

    Almost like a family tradition, Mike Tracy will do his part to clean up downtown Shelbyville this weekend.

    The owner of Tracy’s Home Furnishings will don police attire to patrol downtown for the re-enactment of the shooting of Brig. Gen. Henry Denhardt, which took place 80 years ago and thrust Shelbyville into the national spotlight.

  • SHELBYVILLE CITY COUNCIL - Electric and natural gas franchises

    Up for discussion will be an ordinance creating and establishing a bid for a non-exclusive electric franchise and a non-exclusive natural gas franchise when the Shelbyville City Council convenes Thursday for its regularly scheduled meeting at 6:30 p.m. at city hall, 315 Washington Street.

    The new ordinance would allow for the placement of facilities for the transmission, distribution and sale of electrical energy within the public right-of-way of the city of Shelbyville for a 10-year duration and for natural gas for a 20-year duration.

  • Four paws for Paxton

    Parents know that going anywhere with little ones can be a challenge.

    But for Southside Elementary art teacher Michelle Thomas and her husband Delonte, going out with their children can be an extremely overwhelming task. That’s because not only do they have three little ones, but their 5-year-old son, Paxton, has autism.

    Activities most of us take for granted like a dinner out, a trip to the grocery, our kid’s soccer game, aren’t a quick trip for the Thomas family.

  • Painting by numbers

    If you noticed some roads throughout Shelby bearing freshly striped paint just before receiving a fresh coat of asphalt, your eyes were not deceiving you.

    Some roads that were being repaved were striped by mistake, officials said.

    Kentucky State Transportation Cabinet Public Information Officer Andrea Clifford said the striping contractor for Shelby’s state road projects is Reynolds Sealing and Striping Inc.

    However, officials from that company said they were not responsible.

  • Jewish is out of local hospitals

     On Sept. 1, Catholic Health Initiatives became the "sole sponsor" or owner of KentuckyOne Health, when the parent company bought out The Jewish Heritage Fund for Excellence’s interests in a $150 million deal.

  • The legacy of a witness

    Next week Main Street will close and people will gather around to lay witness to a dramatic scene, much like they did 80 years ago.

    On Sept. 20, 1937, a gunshot resonated through the streets of downtown Shelbyville when the brothers of Oldham County murder victim Verna Garr Taylor shot and killed her alleged murderer, Brig. Gen. Henry Denhardt.

    But when the scene plays out this time, it will be a bit more theatrical, as the community gathers to reenact the event in honor of the eightieth anniversary.