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Today's News

  • 100 percent leased and (nearly) ready to open

    With less than three weeks until opening day for The Outlet Shoppes of the Bluegrass, construction workers on the property are hard at work.

    The 365,000-square-foot retail center located just south of Interstate 64 in Simpsonville is scheduled for a VIP opening on July 30 and the grand opening July 31.

    “This shopping center is a hundred percent leased. That is very rare, and we couldn’t be more excited,” said Gina Slechta, Vice President of Marketing for Horizon Group Properties.

  • Diageo approved for sewer usage

    Diageo officials received approval Tuesday night from the Shelbyville Municipal Water and Sewer Commission for it’s new distillery to be included in the service area.

  • Lincoln Institute celebrates 102 years

    n 1912, in reaction to the Day Law that segregated black and white students, the doors opened to The Lincoln Institute in Simpsonville, a boarding high-school established for African-Americans.

    After a rise in integrated schools, The Lincoln Institute was closed in 1966, but for 54 years it was a bastion of reading, writing and arithmetic.

    This weekend the school’s alumni will reunite, with more than fifty-years worth of students attending.

  • TRIPLE S PLANNING COMMISSION:Faurecia moves closer to Simpsonville location

    It appears that Simpsonville is one step closer to opening 400 new jobs as the Triple S Planning Commission will hear development plans for a 119,430 square feet facility on Kingbrook Commerce Park Tuesday evening.

    Although officials with Faurecia continue to decline to comment on the auto parts manufacturing company’s plans to locate in Simpsonville, the company is moving forward with its plans.

  • Gardening collection covers it all from spring through winter

    Plump ears of sweet corn, rows of sweet, juicy watermelons and a bounty of other fresh vegetables straight from the garden is Walt Reichert’s idea of living the good life.
    Now he is sharing his lifelong knowledge of gardening with the world in his newly published book, Walt’s Wisdom, a Cornucopia of Gardening Miscellany.

  • New laws go into effect next week

    Twenty-two new laws being are being implemented as of this month, including a bill regarding more than $5 billion in road repair projects.

    The laws, which go into effect on Tuesday, were approved during the Kentucky General Assembly’s 2014 regular session, which adjourned on April 15.  While some went into effect immediately, like a bill preventing the sale of electronic cigarettes to minors, other bills had up to 90 days to take effect.

  • Lillian Andriot: Nov. 29, 1919 to July 8, 2014

    After passing away Tuesday at age 94, Lillian Andriot has left her family a legacy more precious than anything money can buy – she has bequeathed a legacy of love.

    “I am grateful that I got to grow up in a really loving family where there was no unhappiness,” said Andriot’s daughter, Toni Fry. “I know it sounds crazy, but I got to wear my rose colored glasses my whole life.”

  • ‘I gave him life twice’

    After learning that her grown son had a rare-incurable illness that would destroy both his kidneys, Judith Nigh did not hesitate – her decision to give him one of her kidneys was the most natural thing in the world, she said.

    “It was an honor and a blessing that God made it possible for me to do this for him,” she said.

  • Construction underway on new solid waste facility

    Construction on the county’s new solid waste facility began Thursday and officials say the center should open in four months.

    Newly hired Solid Waste Director Rick Solomon said construction, originally scheduled for an August/September completion date, was delayed because of weather.

  • County hires new solid waste director

    Shelby County has a new solid waste director, a transplant from New Mexico who has been living in Shelby County for 12 years.

    Rick Solomon, who retired from a 20-year career as an environmental engineer at a New Mexico oil company, headed east after retirement, “Because I wanted to get away from the desert.”

    Since his finance was working as a state employee for the state of Kentucky, a move to Shelbyville seemed logical, he said.

    He also went back to work, again as an environmental supervisor, for the state of Kentucky.