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Today's News

  • Prayer vigil for Trey Williams comforts family

    A cold wind and cloudy skies Wednesday night didn’t keep friends and family of a teen killed three years ago in a police shooting from gathering to remember him on almost the very spot where his life ended on Clifton Court.

    “We want to thank everyone for coming out to commemorate this young man’s life, even though it’s been three years ago, the same tears still come back today,” said Justin Barnes, pastor of the Greater Shiloh Temple Church in Shelbyville.

  • Chatham house being torn down

    More than a year and a half after being nearly destroyed in a devastating fire, a Shelby County landmark home is finally being torn down.

    Officials at Gra-Kat Environmental Services were on the property of the structure known as the Chatham House Thursday and said they were preparing to demo the house but had to take the columns down first.

    “We want to be very careful because of the doctor’s office next door,” said Nick Yount with Gra-Kat.

  • Triple S Planning Commission: Breighton Business Center goes residential

    Once tabbed as light industrial park, the Breighton Business Center has now been cleared for an apartment development.

    Kerry Magan presented zone change request on behalf of Roberts & Smith 2, LLC that would change six tracts of the Breighton Business Center from General Interchange (X-2) to Multi-family Residential (R-4).

    “We are proposing to construct two hundred and sixteen apartments on nine buildings on fifteen acres,” Magan said.

  • Decorative Indian corn has a place on your plate, too

    It’s the time of year to admire festive arrangements of red corn that pop up everywhere, from adorning hay bales in front yards, to fall window displays in shops, to the centerpiece for your Thanksgiving feast.

    But red corn, or Indian corn, as it’s widely referred to, has uses other than ornamental. The thing is, not many people know that, at least not anymore.

    “Well, I don’t know if you can eat it, but you sure can drink it,” said Shelbyville Mayor Tom Hardesty.

  • Picking turkeys not as easy as pie

    Choosing the type of turkey to put on your Thanksgiving table can be as difficult of a decision as what type of sides you want to serve alongside.

    No longer is purchasing a turkey just a matter of deciding the right weight for the number of guests attending. Now the mind is bogged down with terms like organic, free-range, pastured, heritage and natural.

    In addition, there are similar yet confusing options like frozen, previously frozen, not previously frozen and fresh.

  • Breaking social walls at lunch

    Schools across the county will be mixing things up at the end of the month, when they will be asked to step out of their comfort zones and sit at a different table for lunch.

    What may seem like a small task can have an enormous impact, Superintendent James Neihof explained.

    “When students interact with those who are different from them, biases and misperceptions can fall away,” he said.

  • Avoiding the Thanksgiving chaos

     

    Commercials lead us to believe Thanksgiving is just a day of smiling and joyful behavior around a large table filled with perfectly prepared dishes.  But in reality, we all know that behind every gorgeous Thanksgiving Day spread is a crowded, messy kitchen filled with chaos and commotion.

    But every year, more businesses seem to be providing a solution to the Thanksgiving stress, offering to do the hard work for you, so you can enjoy the time with your family.

  • Shooting leaves Shelby man dead, family confused

    Residents are still reeling in shock in the aftermath of a police shooting that has left a Shelbyville man dead and neighbors and family members wondering what happened to lead up to the tragic events of Sunday night.

    “It’s the most devastating thing; I cannot believe it,” said Linda Blair Davis, mother of Christopher Horine, who was pronounced dead at the University of Louisville Hospital after an altercation with a Kentucky State Police trooper in a Shelby County neighborhood just east of Shelbyville.

  • Diageo ready to become part of the community

    Since breaking ground on the $115 million Bulleit Distilling Co. in August, members of the community have expressed curiosity in the project.

    Dan Feeser, Director of Engineering of Diageo of North America, which owns the Bulleit brand, addressed some of those questions and concerns when he spoke to the Shelbyville Rotary Club Tuesday afternoon, but the also left several questions unanswered.

    In consideration of the existing landscape, Feeser spoke of the distillery’s desire to mesh with their surroundings.

  • Freak snow brings early winter temps

    The three inches of snow that fell in Shelbyville on Monday was a rare occurrence for this time of year, forecasters say.

    Although it’s true that last year Shelbyville experienced a dusting of snow twice in the month of November, there hasn’t been a snowfall to match Monday’s for 108 years. In Nov. 14, 1906, Shelbyville got three inches of snow. The second highest snowfall in November before Turkey Day was on Nov. 4, 1936, when 7.4 inches fell.