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Today's News

  • DUIs, injury accidents down

    Last year’s highway statistics showed a marked improvement from past years in terms of safety, with fewer drivers arrested for driving while intoxicated and nearly a quarter fewer injury accidents.

    And that decrease in injury accidents even came with an increase in overall accidents, although by a small margin. Fatalities did increase by one in 2014, up to 6, but that number included several unusual accidents, and none involving two vehicles.

  • School tax rate expected to remain unchanged

    The Shelby County Board of Education will hold a special called meeting at 7 p.m. Thursday at the district’s offices, 1155 Main Street, to discuss the tax rate for fiscal year 2016.

    The board has already shared their aspiration at two former meetings to not increase the rate.

    Superintendent James Neihof said Thursday during the regularly scheduled board meeting that he is recommending the local tax rate not change and shared the rationale on his suggestion.

  • SHELBYVILLE CITY COUNCIL: City advancing toward brewery additions

    The Shelbyville City Council will hold a discussion Thursday at 6:30 at City Hall, 315 Washington Street, concerning a recommendation by the Triple S Planning Commission to include breweries, brew pubs, micro breweries and micro distilleries to the city’s zoning regulations.

    “I think it would be a good economic boost for our community especially for the downtown,” Mayor Tom Hardesty said in July.

  • County tax reading is Thursday

    The Shelby County Fiscal Court will set the county tax rate Thursday at a special called meeting for that purpose.

    At the Aug. 18 meeting of the Shelby County Fiscal Court, Shelby County Judge-Executive Rob Rothenburger explained the procedure.

    “We are going to do the tax hearing on Sept. 3 at 8:30 [a.m.], followed by a special meeting to set the tax rate the same day,” he said.

  • SHELBY COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD: Concerns loom regarding graduation requirements

    The Shelby County Board of Education heard the concern of a Shelby County High School student’s father, John Masters, during their public comments portion of their meeting Thursday regarding the district’s new standards for college and career readiness for the 2015-16 school year.

    “They have to pass the ACT (American College Testing) test for college and career readiness, that’s a requirement from KDE [the Kentucky Department of Education]. My concern is the ACT test was not designed for that purpose.”

  • Drug use on the rise

     

  • Assessment identifies community needs

    An organization that has been awarding grants to charitable and other organizations for 25 years has taken steps to zero in more precisely on which ones need money the most.

    At a public gathering on Wednesday, those findings will be disclosed by representatives of the two agencies that are leaders in local grant giving, the Shelby County Community Foundation and Metro United Way.

  • Bill could prolong summer break

    As the doors to schools reopen, gates to theme parks across the nation generally close.  Summer break is discouraging for some kids but it can be a major financial burden for many businesses that depend on the revenue of summer vacationers and the employment of students.

    A bill headed to the senate looks to rectify that by extending summer break.

    Katie Fussenegger, executive director of the Shelby County Tourism & Visitors Bureau, said she sees a decline in tourism once schools reopen.

  • New Main Street business will cater to kids

    With piles of unassembled playground parts piled against the walls, the developing business at 525 Main Street in Shelbyville may not seem like much now.  But in the coming weeks, that building will become the headquarters for laughing, excited children, as Kaleidoscopes, a new indoor play park, is unveiled.

    With three stories, the building will encompass a rock wall, a Lego room and numerous play areas.

    “There’s going to be huge playground structures, different things like that around here,” said manager Leslie Shoulders.

  • A heart for home

    When Paul Fryman left Shelbyville four decades ago, he was a shy teenager who never dreamed that a career in ministry would one day lead him back to the only place he had ever really called home.

    He remembers how, in 1974, two years before he graduated from Shelbyville High School, his church family enveloped him, with a love that still warms his heart today, after he announced his desire to enter the ministry.