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Today's News

  • Thanks

    We want to thank everyone who participated in the benefit for Tom and Vicky wise. Words cannot express the appreciation that we have. From the donation of the facility, all of the individuals and businesses that donated food, money, and items for the auction and all of the volunteers working the fish fry, this would not have been possible without you. In our time of need, it is a wonderful feeling to know that there are so many people and businesses that are willing to lend a helping hand. That's what made this benefit so special. We were asking for help, and everyone we asked responded.

  • Dry spell resistance - Alternative water could head through Shelby

    Shelby County is one step closer to forming a Shelby-Franklin Regional Water Commission and developing a water pipeline that could provide water in times of need.

  • Nifty company settles in Shelby

    A Japanese company with an American name is making a name for itself in Shelby County.

    Nifco North America, Inc. opened a manufacturing facility on Hudson Boulevard in Hi Pointe Industrial Park this past spring. The company is a really big fish in Japan, being the country's principal manufacturer of industrial plastic parts and components, to capture a dominant 70 percent share of the market with an annual turnover of $1.1 billion.

  • Man sues after genital amputation

    A Waddy man and his wife are suing two doctors who they say amputated the man's penis without his consent.

    Phillip and Deborah Seaton filed a malpractice suit in Shelby County Circuit Court last week against Dr. John Patterson of Frankfort, who performed the surgery, and Dr. Oliver James of Shelbyville, who administered anesthetic to Seaton.

  • A hurricane in Shelby? Been there, done that

    So I'm sitting in the upstairs bedroom of my home two Sundays ago, getting ready for my first full day at work in Shelby County.

    I feel the building sort of shaking, the wall beside me vibrating, the wind whistling and, out the window, I see oak trees bending like palms.

    The wind had been blowing hard all morning, but this was ridiculous.

    My wife and I had been glued to the Weather Channel for several days, getting our fix of Hurricane Ike's battering of the Gulf Coast, so TV was tuned when we sprang from our bed to see to see what was the matter.

  • A crumbling American dream

    We seem these days to have too much government without any common-sense approach to correct anything.

    Both parties in Congress keep making laws that favor corporations, which don't hesitate to put money where it's to their benefit. Their own needs are met and executed in a way that leaves no possible way a man trying to start a small business has a chance.

  • 104 days, 2,100 miles

    Everybody thinks about just getting away.

    Maybe you want to sail the Caribbean, maybe you want to backpack through Europe, or maybe you want to hike the Appalachian Trail.

    Well, William Stewart might be able to give you a few pointers.

    Stewart, a 20-year-old native of Shelby County, returned last week from a 104-day hike that took him from Katahdin, Maine, to Springer Mountain, Ga., the full length of the Appalachian Trail.

    "I just wanted to step out of the fast-paced world," Stewart said. "I just wanted to get out and see what it's all about."

  • Rockets' trip to Johnson Central costly

    Last Thursday SCHS football coach Todd Shipley said he wasn't happy about going to Johnson Central for a last-minute replacement game on Friday night.

    He was probably less happy on the long bus ride home.

    Not only did the Rockets drop to 0-3 on the season in a 36-29 loss to the Golden Eagles, but Shelby County also lost Cody Bland to a broken leg on the opening kickoff and starting quarterback Branden Cresap to a severe knee injury in the third quarter.

  • Clear Creek gets rehab, still closed to the public

    Officials have a partial answer about what has happened to Clear Creek and are in the process of devising a plan to correct the situation, according to state environmental inspector Clark Dorman.

    "We are working on that as we speak," he said.

    Dorman said the fill kill in the creek was determined to be caused from a lack of oxygen in the water, in addition to some other things.

  • Drug search turns up 20 pot plants

    Officers found an unusually large number of marijuana plants at a residence during a drug bust just north of Finchville last week.

    According to Shelby County Sheriff's detective Jason Rice, when deputies arrived at the residence at 3121 Veechdale Road, they discovered 20 plants of what Rice described as being of "very high quality."

    "Each plant was worth at least the normal value of what is usually grown around here," he said.

    Rice said the marijuana contained a high THC content, and he estimated the street value of the plants at about $50,000.