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Today's News

  • Community datebook

    Support groups

    Oct. 16 -- Parents of Children with Learning Differences and Attention Difficulties meets at 7 p.m. at the Learning Disabilities Association of Kentucky, 2210 Goldsmith Ln., #118, Louisville. For additional information call the LDA office at 502-473-1256.

    Public can attend

    Oct. 16 -- Shelbyville City Council meets at 6:30 p.m. at City Hall, 315 Washington St.

    Oct. 20 -- Shelbyville Water and Sewer Commission meets at 6:30 p.m. at 1059 Washington St.

  • Let's all recycle

    I am 9 years old, and I would like to tell everyone about our Shelbyville Recycling Center and the nice people who work there. I am learning about "going green" in home schooling. We started recycling, and we took a tour of the recycling center. We saw what we could recycle and what we couldn't recycle. A couple of weeks later, we took our recyclables to the same place and they truly seemed happy to see us again. They were so helpful. We drove up, and they even helped us unload our car!

  • Auto Pointe to shut down

    One of Shelbyville's biggest car dealerships is driving off the lot and out of business: Auto Pointe of Shelbyville will close its doors Oct. 31.

    Owner Matt Fetter said a plummeting economy has made buying and selling automobiles difficult.

    "It's the economy," he said. "We are suffering from it just like everyone else."

    Auto Pointe, which sells pre-owned vehicles of all makes and models at 200 Boone Station Road, has been in the community since January 2005.

  • Drug advisory council saved by grant

    A local agency dedicated to preventing drug abuse has received a grant that will allow it to continue to operate.

    Terry Graney, treasurer and board member of the Shelby County Drug/Alcohol Advisory Council, Inc., said the council has received a $125,000 Drug Free Communities federal grant, renewable for five years, bringing the total grant amount to $625,000.

    This funding will allow the non-profit organization to hire some staff members, including a director-without which continued operation would be impossible, Graney said.

  • Hospital named in law suit

    Jewish Hospital Shelbyville has now been added to the list of parties being sued by a Waddy man who says his penis was amputated by mistake last fall.

    Phillip Seaton, 61, and his wife, Deborah, filed suit Oct. 7 in Shelby County Circuit Court against the hospital where the surgery was performed last October.

    Seaton has previously filed suit against the doctor who performed the surgery, Dr. John Patterson, the anesthesiologist, Dr. Oliver James, as well as Commonwealth Urology, PSC, in Frankfort, which employs Patterson.

  • Officials reviving human rights commission

    Officials from the county's three governments plan to resuscitate a local human rights commission that has been inactive for more than a decade.

    Shelby County Judge-Executive Rob Rothenburger, Shelbyville Mayor Tom Hardesty and Simpsonville Mayor Steve Eden said they will appoint members to a human rights commission board that will serve as a local adjunct of the Kentucky Human Rights Commission. The state rights commission is charged with enforcing the state's Civil Rights Act, which forbids discrimination in employment, housing and public accommodations.

  • County gets FEMA grant for windstorm damage

    Shelby County will be one of 33 counties in Kentucky to receive federal aid to clean up after last month's windstorm.

    Local Disaster and Emergency Services officials said the county will receive $154,000 from the U.S. Department of Homeland Security's Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) because of the downed trees, roof damage and other destruction caused when the remnants of Hurricane Ike brought 70-mile-per-hour winds to the county on Sept. 14.

  • A personal note to Simpsonville

    As a person with a vested interest, I have but three words to the Simpsonville City Council about its consideration of building a downtown along the U.S. 60 corridor: Please be careful.

    Though I grew up about a mile outside its borders, for the first two decades of my life I went to it or through Simpsonville for just about everything. I called Simpsonville home, even if my address was Rural Route 2, Shelbyville.

    Always affectionately known as Simp, this was place of, you might say, simplicity: quaint, quiet and quintessentially personal.

  • Exciting find in Shelby County

    On Saturday a week ago, my wife, two guests from Kansas and I had the opportunity to take a tour of a Saddlebred horse farm with our guide, Charlie Kramer, executive director of Shelby County Tourism Bureau. Charlie was very knowledgeable and was patient answering all our questions about the farm, the horses and the history of Shelbyville and made us feel he truly wanted us to learn.

  • Lady Rockets rip Spencer, 6-0

    Shelby County's girls' soccer team started slow but added a second-half flurry of goals to beat Spencer County, 6-0, in the first round of the 16th District Tournament at Spencer County on Monday.

    The victory put the Rockets (11-7-1) into the second round of the district tournament against Oldham County on Tuesday.

    The championship game is tonight at 6:30 p.m. at Spencer County.

    Goals from Sarah Robinson and Alex Patterson gave the Rockets a 2-0 halftime lead, but Coach Joe Turner said he wasn't pleased.