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Today's News

  • What we think: Beshear's ideas have some merit

     There are many arguments to be had and several votes to be taken, but we like the ideas for budget adjustments that Gov. Steve Beshear put on the table last week.

    Cutting expenses these days can be too quick and to the quick, but Beshear seems to have a reasoned and surgical approach to what is likely the hardest decision he will face in 2009.

    The economy of Kentucky is sagging along with the nation’s and operating under even greater threat of the possible failure by the automakers, which employ so many and contribute so much to the state’s coffers.

  • Duckett case: 5 weeks, no killer

    More than five weeks after James Duckett was found brutally murdered in an execution- style manner at his home on Rockbridge Road, his killer remains on the loose.

    Police have appealed to the public and offered a reward to help locate the killer, but so far, no useful information has surfaced.

    But admittedly, the public has had precious little information to go by.

    Duckett's death sometime before Nov. 10 remains a curious web of minimal information and wild public rumor about a type of crime seldom seen in Shelby County.

  • Shelby Energy workers unionize

    Local electrical workers are citing safety concerns as the reason they have voted to be represented by a labor union.

  • New Business

    New Business

    Who we are: Neutral One

    Owned by: Lin Fan

    Where: 132 Midland Trail, in the shopping center by Tractor Supply

  • Auto industry concerns continue

    The chief executives from the nation’s three largest automakers left Washington on Thursday empty-handed after spending three days pleading for a $25 billion bailout.

    With no government assistance, the companies and millions of U.S. jobs are in question, including close to 400 jobs here in Shelby County.

    The leaders of Ford, GM and Chrysler came before a Senate panel this week asking for funds to help the companies stay solvent during the current economic crisis.

  • EARLIER: County hit hard by job losses

    2008 has been a bear for local industries.

    By the end of the year, more than 10 percent of the industrial jobs that were here in January will have been gobbled up by economic issues that have plagued local employers.

    Shelby County began the year with nearly 5,400 industrial jobs, but by the end of December, 568 of those will be no more.

    And that's assuming that no more cuts are announced between now and then. Most recently announced were cutbacks at Leggett & Platt in Simpsonville, which will let 85 people go by December.

  • A Christmas blessing

    Even with the country officially in a recession, two large annual charitable events that feed the needy will help ensure that most people in Shelby County will not go hungry on Christmas Day.

    Christmas at Claudia's and the Annual Community Christmas Dinner at the Multi-Purpose Community Action Agency will be held Dec. 21 and Dec. 25, respectively.

  • EARLIER: Shelby County Christmas Parade set for Saturday

    Time to grab your coats and watch some floats.

    The Shelby County Christmas Parade will take place this Saturday at 10 a.m. along Main Street. There is no fee to enter the parade, and all Shelby County organizations and businesses can register a float or group up until Friday.

    Charlie Kramer was selected to be Grand Marshall of the parade. Kramer has been the Shelby County Tourism Director for 16 years and lives in Simpsonville. He said being selected Grand Marshall is something he never imagined.

  • School plans might change

    Next month the Shelby County Public School System is hoping to start construction on a new $40 million school building.

    That much is certain.

    But the grade-level of the students who initially go to school there when it opens in 2010 might be changing.

    This Thursday night the Shelby County School Board will consider forming a Transition Planning Committee for the proposed secondary school building.

  • Teen missing since Thursday

    Police are asking for the public's help in locating a teenaged girl who has been missing from her home in Shelbyville since Thursday.

    Amber Dawn McKinney, 16, was last seen leaving her home on Jonathan Circle on  Thursday morning to go to school, according to Shelbyville Police.