.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's News

  • Remembering Eric

    One of the most painful things that a father might ever have to do is to give the eulogy at his own son's funeral.

    Christopher Wilson now knows that pain.

    Friday night, just five days after his son, Frederic, was tragically killed in a violent windstorm, Christopher told the more than 200 people who gathered for boy's funeral that his son would be remembered for his compassion and love.

    "As a father, I am not impartial, but I think those who knew him know how special he was," he said. "My life changed the day he was born."

  • Rockets fall at Johnson Central, 36-29

    A three-hour bus ride and a powerful Johnson Central running game proved to be too much for the Rockets Friday.

    Shelby County fell to 0-3 on the season with the 36-29 loss in their third straight road game to open the season.

    After Shelby County's originally scheduled home game against Doss was cancelled because of lingering issues with hurricane Ike, the Rockets had to head east, way east to face Johnson Central.

  • A windfall for tree removers

    While most people were running for cover during Sunday's violent windstorm, Todd Gammon and his crew were out hauling off tree limbs as they fell down.

    Gammon, who owns Gammon Tree Service, got his first call shortly after noon on Sunday - just as the wind began to gust.

    "As soon as it [the storm] hit, my phone started ringing," he said. "And we worked right through that storm."

    Since Sunday, Gammon and his crew of six have been putting in 13-hour days - working from dawn till dusk - and will likely stay at this pace for at least two more weeks.

  • Lady Rockets roll over Henry County

    A team never wants to play from behind, but when Henry County scored first against the SCHS girls' soccer team Wednesday, it seemed to spark the Lady Rockets.

    Shelby County (7-4) went on to score seven unanswered goals, dominating the Lady Wildcats (2-4), 7-1.

    "We did not have a good start," SCHS Coach Joe Turner said. "They [Henry County] scored first on a busted play, but I thought we recovered well after that."

  • This new gig offers a chance to come home

    Some of you will know the name, a few will recognize some semblance of the face and too many will remember things from my younger days I wish you would forget.

    But, for better or worse, I am home.

    You may have read recently that the Sentinel-News was getting a new editor and that the guy was a native who was returning from nearly four prodigal decades in the newspaper business.

    And today I want to re-introduce that man to you: Please meet me.

  • Ovarian Cancer

    September is Ovarian Cancer awareness month. The American Cancer Society predicts 22,000 women will be diagnosed with ovarian cancer in the United States and that 15,000 women will die from this disease. In Kentucky, new cases of ovarian cancer each year are around 320. It is the 5th most common cancer among women, and it is the most deadly of all gynecologic cancers. The five-year survival rate for all women is approximately 46%. However, survival rates improve greatly to 93% if it is diagnosed at an early stage before it spreads. Many women have not symptoms until the cancer is advanced.

  • Creek raises a stink: Source of odor, dead fish a mystery

    Residents in the vicinity of Third Street and Governor's Square Shopping Center have been smelling something foul in the air, and they want to know what's causing it.

    Since Sunday they've been reporting the bad odor and dead fish floating in Clear Creek, and local and state experts still are trying to determine their sources.

  • Investigation closes Clear Creek to public - Dead fish, smell force recreational quarantine

    The problem of odor, black water and dead fish continues to puzzle environmental officials, who have been combing the Clear Creek area for answers.

    Clark Dorman, a state environmental inspector called in by local officials, said Friday that until they figure out what is wrong with the creek, no one will be allowed there.

    We dont want people in there swimming or fishing or doing anything else until we determine what is going on there, Dorman said.

  • Simple is best

    Having just returned from a delightful -- and exhausting -- trip to Chicago, I spent Monday evening pondering the feasibility of temporal displacement.

    Time travel may be the stuff of fiction -- at least for now -- but there is no doubt that the clock is moving too fast.

    As a result, we often try to cram too many activities into a short amount of time, thinking we can "beat the clock." Even if we succeed, it beats us as well.

    "Beat" is an accurate term to describe my physical state when I got home from the airport Monday afternoon.

  • Girls' golf team hammers Anderson

    The Shelby County girls' golf team continues to go lower and lower.

    The girls shot a 156, their lowest nine-hole match score in several years, to drill Anderson County by more than 50 strokes Tuesday.

    "They just continue to do it," SCHS Coach Susan Wiley said. "They are just having a good time and playing well. We haven't been in the 150s in a long time."

    Anderson County's 208 put no pressure on the Lady Rockets, and the team just went out and played loose.