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Today's News

  • We congratulate: FDA for its good step on dead-animal problem

     The Food & Drug Administration made a good decision last week when it said it would delay for 60 days its new requirements for how large animals can be disposed. This rule, which was scheduled to take effect in April, stated that the brain and spinal cord had to be removed before dead animals older than 30 months could be transported.

  • We’re all coming down with a bad case of Madness

    A pandemic is overcoming us, spreading quickly. Many already have succumbed, and it’s only a matter of time before it affects you, too.

    For there is no more infectious disease – especially in Kentucky – than that familiar malady called March Madness.

    Only a small percentage of you got sick from eating bad ham or, worse, spending a night in jail. But almost the entire population is stricken with the Madness, to some extent or another. Some started showing the disease as early as October, with symptoms growing increasingly severe.

  • Our industry is changing but it will live on

    A few years ago I had the honor to be on the cover of Editor & Publisher, a decades-old trade magazine that has been a key source of information about our newspaper industry.

    Let me be clear that this was not akin to appearing on People or GQ, but two of my colleagues at the Orlando Sentinel – the Managing Editor and the VP/Product Development -- and I smiled broadly at the camera as poster c

  • Lady Rockets move to 3-0

    The SCHS girls' tennis team gave up its first point of the season but still whipped Anderson County, 4-1, Monday.

    Shelby County No. 1 Paula Pilcher coasted in her first set, winning, 6-2, but struggled some in the second set before pulling it out, 7-5.

  • What we think: Name for school is an A+ idea

    We will avoid passing judgment on the way the Shelby County School Board handled the idea of outsourcing its after-school program to the YMCA.

    We simply will say that the board gets an A for imagination and a D in classroom participation. Its communication with affected families on this issue was non-existent, and the fact that the administration didn’t anticipate the outrage would merit detention.

  • A kick in the butt

    What seems like a cruel April Fool’s Day prank for smokers is actually a harsh reality today as the single largest federal tobacco tax increase ever has combined with a state tobacco tax hike to send  prices skyrocketing.

    The federal tax on a pack of cigarettes jumped 62 cents today, and the state tax doubled from 30 cents to 60 cents.

    The result is a 92-cent increase per pack, which translates to cartons of cigarettes costing around $10 more in the Commonwealth.

  • New school, mixed reviews

    The second of two public forums to hear comment on the proposed use of the new secondary school under construction was held Monday night at West Middle School.

    The option under consideration is to change the organizational plan to create two high schools in the district, with both Shelby County High School and the new Martha Layne Collins High School proposed to house Grades 8 and 9 on the second floor and Grades 10 through 12 on the main floor.

  • Universities know where to get their riders trained

    Shelby County may be known as the "Saddlebred Capital of the World," but three visiting Oregon State University students arrived in Shelby on Friday for another breed - quarter horses.

    And they knew just the place to go.

    Rea Quarter Horses on Locust Lane provided three members of OSU's equestrian team with the horses and a place to loosen up for the 2009 Intercollegiate Horse Show Association Western Semifinals, which took place Saturday at Morehead State University.

  • Boys tennis team has tough start

    At 0-2 on the season SCHS's boys tennis team has struggled through the early part of the year, but Coach Gerald Buchert said his team will improve.

    “We’re not off to a good start, but we have our top three players back, and they improved with a lot of work over the summer,” he said. “The weather has affected us, like everybody I’m sure, and we haven’t gotten a lot of practice time in. But I think we can get better with more work as the season goes on.”

  • Letter to parents has not been sent

    When students went home on Friday, they took a letter to their parents explaining the school board's proposal to switch the operation of after-school programs to the Franklin County YMCA.

    This letter was drawn up in response to a large crowd of angry parents who showed up at the school board meeting at Heritage Elementary on Thursday night to blast the board for attempting to approve the proposal without informing them first.

    Superintendent James Neihof apologized for the oversight, and the board voted to table the matter until it could be explained to parents.