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Today's News

  • Highlighting history

    Nearly packed to capacity, the cafeteria at Northside Early Childhood Center Sunday overflowed with community members eager to learn more about Shelbyville’s African American history during the annual Community Tapestry event.

    Sponsored by the Shelby County Historical Society, the event each year showcases a portion of our community’s African American history through exhibits and speakers and this year the spotlight was on that of former and current service members.

  • Judge denies temporary injunction for solar plant

    A Franklin Circuit judge has ruled against a request for a temporary injunction to prevent the construction of a project to build a solar energy field in Simpsonville.

    Judge Phillip J. Shepherd ruled Tuesday [Feb. 21] to deny the request filed by Gerald Karem, a property owner who lives near the site.

    Shepherd said in his ruling that the court may only grant a temporary injunction where it is clearly shown that the applicant’s rights are being violated or will suffered injury or loss.

  • Shelby’s immigrant population joins protest

    Shelby County businesses felt the impact Thursday of the “A Day Without Immigrants” protest, when activists called on immigrants to protest President Donald Trump's tough stance on immigration by staying home from work or school. That also included not shopping and not eating out, in an effort to highlight the vital role they play in U.S. society

  • SHELBY COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD District revamps facility plans

    The Shelby County Board of Education convened Thursday for a special called meeting to discuss future facility plans for the district.

    The district highlighted a handful of needs that would require construction to accommodate.

  • Heritage gets historical

    If not for a parking lot completely packed to the limit with modern day cars, one might have thought they had slipped back in time at Heritage Elementary School Thursday evening.

    Students dressed as candlemakers, blacksmiths, tailors, carpenters, potters, farmers and other colonial tradesmen and women lined the halls at the elementary school and demonstrated their skills. Table by table parents and other guests slowly edged their way through the crowd and watched as six weeks of their children’s hard work and studious efforts came to fruition.

  • Historical society gets grant to revamp archives

    It may not be a large amount of money, but $500 will go a long way toward connecting Shelby’s future with the past.

    The Shelby County Historical Society received the grant last week, along with similar grants made to 17 other Kentucky counties, from the Kentucky Local History Trust Fund.

    The goal was to help the state’s local historical societies to make better use of their resources, increase membership and generally move forward.

  • SHELBY COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD Board to review progress toward goals

    On Thursday the board will hear an update on the on the 2016-2017 board goals, which were set last April. 

  • Shelby’s immigrant population joins protest

    Shelby County businesses felt the impact Thursday of the “A Day Without Immigrants” protest, when activists called on immigrants to protest President Donald Trump's tough stance on immigration by staying home from work or school on Thursday. That also included not shopping and not eating out, in an effort to highlight the vital role they play in U.S. society.

  • Collins hosts successful VEX competition

    Hundreds of competitors and their supporters flooded the auditorium at Collins High School Saturday for one of the state’s largest VEX Robotics Competitions.

    Coaches Tim Oltman and Shane Ware said 71 teams from across the state turned out for the district’s largest and the state’s third largest VEX competition since the program came into existence more than a decade ago.

    “Five to six hundred people attended,” Oltman said.  “Shelby County teams did really well.”

  • Never too old

    A good portion of Shelby’s historic land records will be accessible for many generations to come thanks to the efforts of two local men.

    Neal Hammon and Charles Long say they are glad the state is updating its historical archives to include digital copies of documents such as they first researched and documented 18 years ago.

    “Charles and I made some photo copies and edited them and put them in this book,” he said. “Those early records that I had worked on were depositions about land records, land claims that were filed,” said Long.