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Local News

  • NEWS DIGEST: July 18, 2014

    House plan restores highway money

    The U.S. House of Representatives voted across party lines, 367 to 55, Tuesday to restore cash to the Highway Trust Fund, which is teetering on insolvency.

    The trust fund provides money to states for bridge, road and other transportation projects and is expected to run short on money starting next month without a stopgap from Congress.

  • Farmers hoping for record corn crop second year in a row

    Farmers in Shelby County produced a record yield last year and so far, conditions are shaping up for a repeat performance, ag experts say.

    “Shelby County had a record yield in 2013 and in terms of production, the county ranked twenty-third in the state,” said Dave Knopf, regional director for the USDA’s Kentucky Field Office, who heads up the state’s National Agricultural Statistics Service.

    Farmers say that so far this year, the corn crop is looking as well, or better, than last year’s.

  • Hinkle appointed to state board of education

    A Shelbyville attorney and former longtime member of the Shelby County School Board has been appointed to serve at the state level.

    Samuel D. Hinkle IVof Shelbyville, an attorney with Stoll Keenon Ogden, was appointed last week by Kentucky Gov. Steve Beshear to the Kentucky Board of Education.

    He represents the 6th Supreme Court District and replaces Judith H. Gibbons, whose term has expired; his term will expire April 14, 2018.

    Hinkle is of one two appointments to the state board, along with retired educator Debra L. Cook of Corbin.

  • NEWS DIGEST: July 16, 2014

    Franklin Circuit Court deputy clerk placed on leave

    The Franklin Circuit Court deputy clerk accused of leaking confidential police information to a drug dealer has been placed on investigative leave, Franklin Circuit Court Clerk Sally Jump said Monday, according to the Frankfort State Journal.

    William Brad McGaughey, 31, received five days paid leave last week. Unless other action is taken, he will return to work Friday.

  • School board not ready to redistrict

    Despite an agenda including a change to the voting districts, the Shelby County Board of Education once again postponed the decision to a later date.

    The motion to table the voting discussion was made by board member Karen Sams, who said she felt the board needed more time in light of new information.

    “We’re not prepared to address the things that have been brought up tonight right here during this discussion, and that’s why I thought it might be best to table it until a future special called working session,” Sams said.

  • City Council will not open with prayer this week

    Thursday’s Shelbyville City Council meeting will not be opened with a prayer, but rather a secular invocation.

    While the idea of a non-religious invocation may leave some scratching their heads in confusion, Shelbyville resident Linda Allewalt, who will present the invocation Thursday, anticipates that the message will provide respect for all residents, regardless of their beliefs.

  • New traffic lights signal roadwork drawing near

    Three new traffic signals should now be in operation at three key spots along Buck Creek Road in the Simpsonville area.

    Traffic engineers say the lights could be completely operational now, but they may still be in flashing mode.

    The lights are the culmination of the Buck Creek Road construction project, which is nearly complete.

  • Diageo approved for sewer usage

    Diageo officials received approval Tuesday night from the Shelbyville Municipal Water and Sewer Commission for it’s new distillery to be included in the service area.

  • Lillian Andriot: Nov. 29, 1919 to July 8, 2014

    After passing away Tuesday at age 94, Lillian Andriot has left her family a legacy more precious than anything money can buy – she has bequeathed a legacy of love.

    “I am grateful that I got to grow up in a really loving family where there was no unhappiness,” said Andriot’s daughter, Toni Fry. “I know it sounds crazy, but I got to wear my rose colored glasses my whole life.”

  • Gardening collection covers it all from spring through winter

    Plump ears of sweet corn, rows of sweet, juicy watermelons and a bounty of other fresh vegetables straight from the garden is Walt Reichert’s idea of living the good life.
    Now he is sharing his lifelong knowledge of gardening with the world in his newly published book, Walt’s Wisdom, a Cornucopia of Gardening Miscellany.