Local News

  • Cuts could hurt local college

    Kentucky's higher education leadership is calling Gov. Steve Beshear's proposal to slash college funding in the Commonwealth dangerously regressive.

    In a letter, signed last week by each of the state's eight public university presidents and others, educators warned Beshear that 12 percent cuts to the Commonwealth's college system could harm higher education and stall system-wide reform efforts.

  • Eaton files for second term

    Donna Eaton filed earlier this month for a second term on Shelbyville City Council, saying she would run on her strong record of controlling taxes.

    "I think I developed a record this year of keeping taxes down and being a voice for the citizens," she said. "I've worked hard not to raise taxes. I'm very proud of my record."

    Eaton, 52, of Cherokee Drive, voted against raising city property tax rates last year. She also voted against the city's 5 percent tax on alcohol, which was ultimately approved last fall.

  • School Board celebrates 100 years

    For the last 100 years, the direction and management of public schools across the state has been in the hands of locally elected boards of education.

    In 1908, the Kentucky General Assembly determined that if would be best if local folks, not the state government, handled the day-to-day operations of schools.

    This month the Shelby Public School System and school boards across the state are celebrating the 100th anniversary of local school board governance as part of Kentucky's observation of School Board Recognition Month.

  • Get Rhythm: Wright students learn music, rhythm

    Fifth graders at Wright Elementary are tapping, thumping and shaking out a rhythm that is getting them recognition across the county.

    Since the beginning of the school year, music teacher Cherly Gibbons has been creating a class-wide rhythm section by teaching each student in the fifth grade class the basic principles of tempo, rhythm, melody and beat.

    And from the responses that the students have received at two recent concerts, their training is paying off.

  • Cold season up but running slow

    Although it may seem like people have been sneezing and coughing as much as usual, Shelby County is having a better than usual cold and flu season, according to local health care officials.

    "We've not had a confirmed case of the flu yet," said Holly Husband, spokesperson for Jewish Hospital Shelbyville.

    That is pretty good news considering Jefferson County confirmed its first case of the flu two weeks ago and Fayette County confirmed its first case in November 2007.

  • Design with Earth in mind

    Growing up on a small farm in Bagdad, Jessica Tennill was surrounded by some of the most beautiful plots of earth in the state and possibly the nation.

    Now in her work as an architect, her passion is to design houses that incorporate and help preserve the earth she loves.

    Tennill, 23, said using earth-friendly materials and energy sources gives greater meaning to the designs she creates.

    "I've been into this sort of thing for a long time," she said. "It brings a whole another layer to the design."

  • Catalpagreen hearing set for Tuesday

    Developers will reveal preliminary plans to zoning commissioners Tuesday night for a proposed 239-lot subdivision, known as Catalpagreen.

    WAZE LLC, reportedly plans to construct mostly single-family units on more than 120 acres near U.S. 60 and Ardmore Lane, according to Ryan Libke, executive director for Triple S PLanning and Zoning. The development calls for some patio-style duplex units, he added.

  • ATV champs to be honored

    Think Easyrider teamed up with backroads dirt and hills.

    ATV racing has become a popular local sport with more than 70 competitors lined up per race through the state Harescramble association.

    Two local residents have risen to the top of the state level in ATV racing and will be honored Saturday night for their winning ATV skills through the state Harescrambles organization.

    Bryce Gartman and Mike Husband will be two of the statewide race winners honored at an awards banquet at Claudia Sanders.

  • Bobcat unleashed at Simpsonville

    A local conservationist has recently helped students at Simpsonville Elementary school get a visual of what their school's mascot really looks.

    Horace Brown, chairman of the Kentucky Environmental Education Council and local outdoorsman, donated a picture he took of a bobcat to the school.

    School administrators said the framed picture of the "Simpsonville Bobcat" was greatly appreciated and will be displayed in a place of honor in the school.

  • Forum set for new schools

    At three upcoming public forums, the Shelby County Board of Education will receive public input on their construction plan for three new school buildings in the county.

    Last month the board decided to adjust the organizational structure and size of a planned secondary school and the time line of a proposed elementary and middle school.

    The board is now required to receive approval from the Local Planning Committee (LPC) for the plan. Part of the state-required approval process is receiving public input on the changes.