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Local News

  • Commissioner talks budgets, CATS

    During his visit to Shelby County on Wednesday, Kentucky Education Commissioner, Dr. Jon Draud, spoke about how proposed education budget cuts would affect Shelby County.

    Draud also announced the state will change the date it administers the CATS battery of tests.

    Draud, who visited Shelby County to participate in Leadership Shelby's "Education Day," said he hopes that the budget shortfall the state faces will not result in budget cuts for the department of education.

  • Simpsonville ordinances address sewers

    Sewers were the focus of three ordinances before the Simpsonville City Commission Wednesday.

    The commission took first reading on an ordinance that would require developers to pay up front when they use the city's engineering firm, allow hotels and motels to pay tap on fees as a commercial rather than residential development, and reduce the sewer board from five members to three.

    City Administrator David Eaton said the city has in the past had problems collecting from developers who had engaged the city's engineer for work on sewer line extensions.

  • Like father, like son? Alleged bandit's dad arrested for bank robbery

    Shelbyville police say they are interested in the arrest of a Shelby County man who was charged with robbing the Central Bank on Harrodsburg Road at 1:30 p.m. Tuesday.

    Kenneth W. Chandler, 47, of Shelbyville, was charged with first-degree robbery and having an expired operator's license.

    According to the report, Chandler is accused of entering the bank, showing a handgun, and demanding money. He escaped with an undisclosed amount of cash before being stopped by police.

  • Apartment fire kills dog

    Shelbyville firefighters battled an apartment fire for three hours Wednesday night that took the life of a local man's dog.

    At about 6:30 p.m., firefighters were dispatched to the Cola Commons apartment complex on U.S. 60 after a smoke alarm sounded.

    When Fire Chief Willard "Tiger" Tucker arrived on the scene, he said he could not see the fire from the outside. But when firefighters made forcible entry into apartment 103, Tucker said they were met with intense heat and black smoke.

  • Cuts could hurt local college

    Kentucky's higher education leadership is calling Gov. Steve Beshear's proposal to slash college funding in the Commonwealth dangerously regressive.

    In a letter, signed last week by each of the state's eight public university presidents and others, educators warned Beshear that 12 percent cuts to the Commonwealth's college system could harm higher education and stall system-wide reform efforts.

  • Eaton files for second term

    Donna Eaton filed earlier this month for a second term on Shelbyville City Council, saying she would run on her strong record of controlling taxes.

    "I think I developed a record this year of keeping taxes down and being a voice for the citizens," she said. "I've worked hard not to raise taxes. I'm very proud of my record."

    Eaton, 52, of Cherokee Drive, voted against raising city property tax rates last year. She also voted against the city's 5 percent tax on alcohol, which was ultimately approved last fall.

  • School Board celebrates 100 years

    For the last 100 years, the direction and management of public schools across the state has been in the hands of locally elected boards of education.

    In 1908, the Kentucky General Assembly determined that if would be best if local folks, not the state government, handled the day-to-day operations of schools.

    This month the Shelby Public School System and school boards across the state are celebrating the 100th anniversary of local school board governance as part of Kentucky's observation of School Board Recognition Month.

  • Get Rhythm: Wright students learn music, rhythm

    Fifth graders at Wright Elementary are tapping, thumping and shaking out a rhythm that is getting them recognition across the county.

    Since the beginning of the school year, music teacher Cherly Gibbons has been creating a class-wide rhythm section by teaching each student in the fifth grade class the basic principles of tempo, rhythm, melody and beat.

    And from the responses that the students have received at two recent concerts, their training is paying off.

  • Cold season up but running slow

    Although it may seem like people have been sneezing and coughing as much as usual, Shelby County is having a better than usual cold and flu season, according to local health care officials.

    "We've not had a confirmed case of the flu yet," said Holly Husband, spokesperson for Jewish Hospital Shelbyville.

    That is pretty good news considering Jefferson County confirmed its first case of the flu two weeks ago and Fayette County confirmed its first case in November 2007.

  • Design with Earth in mind

    Growing up on a small farm in Bagdad, Jessica Tennill was surrounded by some of the most beautiful plots of earth in the state and possibly the nation.

    Now in her work as an architect, her passion is to design houses that incorporate and help preserve the earth she loves.

    Tennill, 23, said using earth-friendly materials and energy sources gives greater meaning to the designs she creates.

    "I've been into this sort of thing for a long time," she said. "It brings a whole another layer to the design."