Local News

  • Man hit by car in fair condition at UoL

    A Shelbyville man is still in the hospital in fair condition after being hit by a car Friday night on Frankfort Road.

    Police say that they discovered Jonathan Baker, 20, lying on the side of the road in the area of the warehouses after receiving several 911 calls from people reporting a man walking in the roadway.

    In his report, Sheriff’s deputy Jeremy Younger said that callers had stated that Baker appeared to be intoxicated, waving his arms and flipping off motorists.

  • Assaults, thefts up

    A flurry of activity surrounded the Outlet Shoppes of the Bluegrass after its opening last year, however, not all of that activity was pumping money back into the local economy. Instead much of that activity kept Simpsonville Police officers on the move during the second half of 2014.

    Thefts in Simpsonville highlighted much of the increase in crime across the county for 2014.

    The small town with the new big mall saw thefts increase 150 percent, rising from 16 in 2013 to 40 in 2014.

  • Traffic light could flash this week

    Officials with the state transportation department and city of Simpsonville can’t seem to agree on when the new light on U.S. 60 at Todds Point Road will begin flashing for a week before it is finally put into action.

    Andrea Clifford, the spokesperson for the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet District 5, estimates the light will first be turned on either Thursday or Friday.

    But Mayor Steve Eden said he doesn’t think so.

  • SHELBY COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD: Three lanes could extend to Rocket Lane

    If you often find yourself inconvenienced by traffic along U.S. 60 at Shelby County High School, you may be glad to hear that a solution is in the works.

    The Shelby County Board of Education will consider allowing the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet to purchase a small portion of their property and grant a temporary construction easement at Thursday’s regularly scheduled meeting at Shelby County High School, 1701 Frankfort Road, Shelbyville. The property is part of the state’s planned expansion for the road.

  • Attracting the masters

    The scene at Interwood Forest Products off Brooks Industrial Drive was a bit out of the ordinary last weekend, as the state’s highest rated chess tournament took over the business on Brooks Industrial Road.

    Fourteen players from six states competed in the showroom on Saturday and Sunday morning.

    Completely silent if not for the hum of florescent lights and the occasional cough, the room encompassed six hand crafted chess tables, each manned with two players sitting silently across from one another. 

  • SHELBYVILLE CITY COUNCIL: Public works presents Stormwater report


  • Grant helps JHS curb violence

    With an objective of curbing bullying and dating violence in Shelby County, Jewish Hospital Shelbyville will use nearly $290,000 in grant funds to support the Green Dot and Safe Dates programs, which are aimed at reducing the number of students who are threatened, attacked or hurt.

    These programs will provide education to students in the community on bullying, as well as the knowledge to identify aggressive acts and skills to reduce the number of incidents.

  • Bill would limit sweeping of funds

    Two local legislators have plans to introduce a bill that would cap sweeping of funds from three state agencies.

    Rep. Brad Montell (R-Shelbyville) and Sen. Paul Hornback (R-Shelbyville) will pre-file a bill for the 2016 Regular Session that, if passed, would cap the transfer of funds from three state agencies that deal with inspections of residential and commercial property in Kentucky.

  • Animal shelter gets grant

    The Shelby County Animal Shelter received a small grant last week from the Kentucky Cattleman’s Foundation.

    The $1,000 grant was from the Animal Shelter Assistance Program, which is in its fifth year and its funded by the foundation.

    Animal Shelter Director Leon Federle said the money has gone toward improving the pet bathing facilities at the shelter, and that he has already purchased the equipment and is in the process of installing it.

  • A welcoming night

    A parking lot overflowing with cars, the sound of children’s laughter and smiling faces milling throughout the building told the story of the success of Northside Early Childhood Center’s open house before Principal Brenda Musick even spoke.

    “It’s going just great,” she said from her vantage point in the lobby, gesturing around at crowds in every room, library, cafeteria and hallways.

    “The parents are enjoying themselves and the children are having a lot of fun meeting their teachers and just exploring the building.”