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Local News

  • Heritage gets historical

    If not for a parking lot completely packed to the limit with modern day cars, one might have thought they had slipped back in time at Heritage Elementary School Thursday evening.

    Students dressed as candlemakers, blacksmiths, tailors, carpenters, potters, farmers and other colonial tradesmen and women lined the halls at the elementary school and demonstrated their skills. Table by table parents and other guests slowly edged their way through the crowd and watched as six weeks of their children’s hard work and studious efforts came to fruition.

  • Construction to begin on new waterline

    Officials with several water districts in Shelby County have expressed excitement about a new waterline that is expected to be under construction as early as next week.

    The 26,075-foot long waterline, which will extend along U.S. 60, has been in the works for a long time, said Bill Eggen, chair of the U.S. 60 Water District.

    “It’s been on the wish list for years,” he said.

    The $2.3 million project is being financed by the Kentucky Infrastructure Authority with a 20-year loan to the District.

  • Old Stone Inn to open under new management

    The Old Stone Inn, which has been closed since for a year since being shut down in February 2016, will soon reopen under new management.

    The Purnell family, which owns the building, said they’re happy to have a new tenant, the Kayrouz Café, opening soon.

    Chris Kayrouz, the restaurant’s owner, who is currently out of the country, was unavailable for comment, but Allen Purnell said he has been working closely with him to get the inn in shape.

  • Never too old

    A good portion of Shelby’s historic land records will be accessible for many generations to come thanks to the efforts of two local men.

    Neal Hammon and Charles Long say they are glad the state is updating its historical archives to include digital copies of documents such as they first researched and documented 18 years ago.

    “Charles and I made some photo copies and edited them and put them in this book,” he said. “Those early records that I had worked on were depositions about land records, land claims that were filed,” said Long.

  • Historic cemetery site lost forever

    A distraught Joseph Ruble took to social media last week to gather the opinions and thoughts of his Shelby County neighbors regarding the despoliation of an historical cemetery on property that once belonged to his family.

  • Collins hosts successful VEX competition

    Hundreds of competitors and their supporters flooded the auditorium at Collins High School Saturday for one of the state’s largest VEX Robotics Competitions.

    Coaches Tim Oltman and Shane Ware said 71 teams from across the state turned out for the district’s largest and the state’s third largest VEX competition since the program came into existence more than a decade ago.

    “Five to six hundred people attended,” Oltman said.  “Shelby County teams did really well.”

  • Shelby’s immigrant population joins protest

    Shelby County businesses felt the impact Thursday of the “A Day Without Immigrants” protest, when activists called on immigrants to protest President Donald Trump's tough stance on immigration by staying home from work or school on Thursday. That also included not shopping and not eating out, in an effort to highlight the vital role they play in U.S. society.

  • Saluting the African American soldier

    Patriotism and the military service of African Americans from Shelby County, particularly during World War I and II, will be the focus of the annual Community Tapestry event this year.

    The event, which is 2 to 5 p.m. Sunday at the Northside Early Childhood Center at 821 College Street in Shelbyville, is a popular annual event that showcases a portion of our community’s African American history through exhibits and speakers to share the pride and accomplishment in Shelby’s African American community.

  • Germinating the industry

    An informal discussion of growing industrial hemp drew about 50 people Thursday at the Shelby County Extension Office, which yielded both a lot of information and a barrage of questions from the audience.

    The event, conducted by the Department of Agriculture, featured a couple of hemp processors, as well as state ag officials, who spoke to the crowd about everything from the value of hemp as a food source to logistical problems in harvesting it.

  • SHELBYVILLE CITY COUNCIL Council will cast final vote on non-partisan elections