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Local News

  • A fiber breakdown

    When Shelbyville entered into the county’s first fiber/telecommunications franchise agreement last week, they opened the door to the future of wireless communication.

    “It’s certainly a good thing for the community going forward,” City Administrator Fred Rogerssaid. “It’s the wave of the future.”

  • Women’s march starts the message for Shelby resident

    With signs of the presidential inauguration still littering the streets, women and men from across the nation descended on Washington D.C. Saturday, not to celebrate Donald Trump’s presidency, but to send a message that the nation needs to continue to support women and minority’s rights.

    In that crowd was Alix Schmidt, a Shelbyville resident who attended with several friends.

  • Golden alert cancelled for missing man

    A Golden Alert has been cancelled for George Blackwell, 77, of Shelby County.

    Blackwell, who has dementia, had been last seen at 5 p.m. traveling south on Taylorsville Road in a white pickup truck.

    Officials at Shelby County Dispatch said Blackwell has been located in Indiana, and is fine; he had just gotten lost, they say and that someone is on the way to go get him.

  • Sentinel-News takes 3rd in KPA General Excellence

    STAFF REPORT

    The Shelbyville Sentinel-News was recognized in the newspaper industry over the weekend with 9 first place awards at the Kentucky Press Association’s annual conference in Louisville.

    The paper won five first place awards for editorial work and four more in advertising, and the editorial staff was recognized with a third place finish in General Excellence for multi-weekly newspapers.

  • Sidewalk project steps up in Simpsonville

    Phase III of the Simpsonville Sidewalk Project is starting to pick up speed with the bid process for the construction coming up in March, said officials.

    The city's attorney, Hite Hays, told the Simpsonville City Commission at Thursday's meeting that before that can take place, all easements must be place, and that process is going well.

    "I've just been working with David [Eaton] on these sidewalk easements and he's been out hustling and we're getting them recorded and filled out," he said.

  • Dishing on issues

    Local politicians State Sen. Paul Hornback (R-Shelbyville) and Rob Rothenburger (R-Shelbyville) took time out from their busy schedules on Friday to hold an informal legislative update discussion at the Stratton Center.

    The pair told the small crowd of about 25, which included heads of government for Shelby County, Shelbyville and Simpsonville, about some new legislation that has been on the forefront during this year’s General Assembly, which convened the first week in January.

  • SHELBY COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD – SCHS team receives national recognition

    When the Shelby County Board of Education convenes for its regularly scheduled meeting Thursday at 7 p.m. at the district’s central office, 1155 West Main Street, will the Shelby County High School Construction Team will be recognized for a national accomplishment.

  • SHELBYVILLE CITY COUNCIL – Council further considers non-partisan elections

    No official changes are in the books just yet, but on Thursday the Shelbyville City Council gave City Attorney Steve Gregory the go-ahead to establish for their consideration an ordinance that would change the city council elections to a non-partisan race.

  • Dishing out dining dollars

    With the first year of the Shelbyville Restaurant Tax in the books, many residents have asked council members where the money is going.

    Shelbyville City Administrator Fred Rogers said in the first year, the city has received about $350,000 from the tax, which was split 50/50 with tourism– meaning the tax generated around $700,000 in Shelbyville in the first year.

    Some funds have already been put to good use, Shelbyville City Council member Bobby Andriot said, but they are being cautious about moving forward too quick.

  • Dishing out dining dollars

    With the first year of the Shelbyville Restaurant Tax in the books, many residents have asked council members where the money is going.

    Shelbyville City Administrator Fred Rogers said in the first year, the city has received about $350,000 from the tax, which was split 50/50 with tourism– meaning the tax generated around $700,000 in Shelbyville in the first year.

    Some funds have already been put to good use, Shelbyville City Council member Bobby Andriot said, but they are being cautious about moving forward too quick.