.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Local News

  • Schools struggle to hire minorities

    Although 26 percent of the students in the Shelby County public school system are from an ethnic minority, only 5 percent of the education positions in the district are filled by minorities, according to a recent report.

  • SCHS student faces weapons charge

    A 16-year-old male was arrested Wednesday and charged with bringing a knife to Shelby County High School and threatening another male student.

    According to a Shelby County Sheriff's report, the boy, who is a junior, made a verbal threat in a classroom involving another student and was taken to the office where administrators then discovered he had a fold-out hunting knife in his possession.

    A note that mentioned the word "murder" was also found in the student's possession, the report said.

  • Math matters: Program aiding Clear Creek

    Math and fun are usually polar opposites in the minds of most children. But in Charlotte Baker's class, students who had been lagging behind in the subject are finding that math adds up and it can be enjoyable.

    Baker, a teacher at Clear Creek elementary, is seeing students excel through a program called Numbers World. Through the program, students learn basic math skills with interactive instruction, activities and worksheets.

  • Mayor: 'Illegal' ID system a state issue

    Mayor Tom Hardesty Tuesday said city-issued IDs and other initiatives hyped by some as potential strategies for validating illegal immigrants should be left up to the state.

    An independent commission tasked with investigating illegal immigration in Lexington last week recommended city leaders there model a photo ID system for its several thousands of suspected undocumented residents after a program in New Haven, Conn.

  • Annexation plan draws protest

    Simpsonville Mayor Steve Eden said critics of the city's plan to annex land near the I-64 interchange with Buckcreek Road have misconceptions about the city's goals for a portion of that land.

    "If they would sit down and talk to us, they would learn that we all want the same thing there," Eden said. "None of us {on the city commission} want heavy equipment there. As long as I'm mayor there won't be heavy equipment on that property, only things that benefit the traveling public."

  • Schools mark 'book week'

    While Debra Colby read "Mary had a little lamb" to a class of first graders at Wright elementary on Tuesday afternoon, the children listened attentively as the story unfolded. As Colby, the school's library and media specialist, read and pointed to the pictures in the book, one student laughed and said, "You can't bring animals to class."

    This week, reading sessions such as this are abundant as educators across the county participate in the National Children's Book Week.

  • Electrical worker falls to death

    A 34-year-old man died after falling 30-feet from a bucket truck Monday in the 5500 block of Vigo Road in Bagdad.

    The man, who has been identified Carroll Cosby, of Monticello, worked for Dobson Construction Co., a subcontracting company hired by Shelby Energy to help upgrade power lines in the Bagdad area.

    Bagdad Fire Chief Rusty Newton, who responded to the accident scene Monday afternoon, said Cosby was flown by helicopter to University of Louisville Hospital Monday but died early Tuesday morning, apparently from the injuries sustained in the accident.

  • Where does your money go?

    Sooner or later, you have to pay your property taxes.

    If you don't, you face penalties and having a lien put against your property.

    But what exactly do you get in return for your money?

    "It's the best bang for your buck when it comes to county property taxes," said County Judge Executive Rob Rothenburger. "It's a great value for people who reside in Shelby County."

    This year's county property tax rate is .11 per $100 of assessed value. That means that if you're home is assessed as having a value of $100,000, you pay the county $110.00.

  • Deputy jailer charged with giving drugs to inmate

    A female deputy jailer has been arrested on charges she provided marijuana and prescription drugs as well as other contraband to an inmate at the Shelby County Detention Center.

    Teresa A. Goodlett, 44, was arrested Friday and charged with three counts of first-degree promoting contraband, a felony, and four counts of second-degree promoting contraband, a misdemeanor.

    According to a Shelby County Sheriff's report, Goodlett admitted she provided marijuana and 12 prescription muscle relaxers to Shelby County Detention Center inmate Kent Skaggs.

  • Several treated for suspected food poisoning

    At least eight people were treated for suspected food poisoning Friday after consuming salad at a church luncheon, according to health officials and patient reports.

    "We did have three people come to the hospital with symptoms that were similar to that of food-related illness," said Jewish Hospital-Shelbyville spokesperson Holly Husband.

    Later lab tests from JHS showed negative screenings for the top four food poisoning agents in patients treated there, Husband said.