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Local News

  • Simpsonville candidates speak on issues

    The four individuals elected to the Simpsonville City Commission next week will have to deal with residential growth, maintaining public services and possibly taking steps toward creating a downtown area in the city.

    The four commissioners who are currently sitting on the board are all running for reelection. They will compete with two challengers for the four open seats next Tuesday.

    The election, which is non-partisan, will decide who works with Mayor Steve Eden and City Administrator David Eaton for the next two years.

  • Arrest made with help of off-duty dispatcher

    An off-duty police dispatcher was instrumental in leading to a traffic-related arrest last week, according to Shelbyville Police.

    According to the police report, off duty dispatcher Jeremy Younger was driving behind a 1996 Pontiac on Frankfort Road when he noticed that the car was “all over the roadway.”

    Younger got on his cell phone and called police, who arrived at his location and got in behind the car, driven by Cresencio Martinez of Frankfort.

  • County forced to pay high prices to winterize roads

    Road crews are gearing up for winter, and Road Supervisor Carl Henry said a major part of that preparation includes having enough road salt on hand.

    The problem is, the price of salt has nearly tripled since last winter, Henry told fiscal court members Tuesday. He advised them to accept a bid from Morton's Salt for $120 per ton, because he had checked out prices from other companies, and Morton's was the lowest.

    “We're not going to get it any cheaper,” he said.

    Road salt prices the previous winter topped out at about $48 per ton.

  • County forced to pay high prices to winterize roads

    Road crews are gearing up for winter, and Road Supervisor Carl Henry said a major part of that preparation includes having enough road salt on hand.

    The problem is, the price of salt has nearly tripled since last winter, Henry told fiscal court members Tuesday. He advised them to accept a bid from Morton's Salt for $120 per ton, because he had checked out prices from other companies, and Morton's was the lowest.

    "We're not going to get it any cheaper," he said.

    Road salt prices the previous winter topped out at about $48 per ton.

  • Zap-car firm tours Martinrea

    A manufacturer of electric automobiles toured the Martinrea Heavy Stamping facility in Shelbyville on Monday, raising questions about the future of what once was Shelbyville's largest employer.

    The visit sparked speculation across the county that the local plant might be sold to up-and-coming Integrity Automotive, but Randall Waldman, Integrity's CEO, said he doesn't want to buy the whole plant but only parts of it after it shuts down.

  • School redistricting causes concerns

    Tensions were high Tuesday night as school administrators and local parents discussed the district's plan to reassign up to 60 students to a different school next year.

    The district's plan calls for Simpsonville Elementary school students who live in parts of Finchville to be reassigned to Southside Elementary School.

    The meeting, which was held at Southside, was designed to allow district personnel to hear from the parents who are affects and to discuss possible alternative solutions.

  • Triple S to consider regulations on satellite dishes

    Triple S Planning and Zoning is considering new regulations that would dictate where homeowners can install satellite dishes.

    Amended regulations discussed at Tuesday's meeting would require a new permit process for the installation of dishes greater than three feet in diameter and would create explicit language specifying where on a house a homeowner could place a dish that is three feet or smaller.

  • School-board candidates focus on the issues

    Whoever is elected to the Shelby County School Board this year will have to help plan three new school buildings, address lagging test scores at the secondary level and balance a budget with shrinking state support.

    In recent weeks, candidates have been busy handing out leaflets and making phone calls to rally support for the Nov. 4 vote.

    Two of the three open seats on the Shelby County School Board will be contested this election cycle.

    Brenda Jackson, who represents division 5, is the only member of the school board who will run unopposed.

  • 'W' takes a long time to go nowhere

    Director Oliver Stone previously had dug deep into our country's presidential history to give us revealing films like JFK and Nixon. With Stone in charge of W., the potential was huge. Never before has a film of this magnitude been released about a president who was still in office. Factor in that George W. Bush's presidency has been the most dramatic reign in some time, and you should have a formula for something spectacular.

    Instead, we got 129 minutes of W's daddy issues and not much else.

  • Dead man, shooter were roommates

    Circumstances around a shooting that left a man dead Saturday has thrown his family into a turmoil of grief and confusion.

    David L. Fletcher, 28, of Shelbyville, was shot in what was thought to be an attempted burglary on Brown Ave. He was accompanied by two men who were charged with burglary in that incident, Timothy Carpenter, 22, of La Grange, and Joshua Fast, 22, of Crestwood.

    Eric Reynolds, the resident who shot Fletcher, has not been charged in connection with the shooting and has been unavailable for comment.