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Local News

  • Fight against blight

    City officials will debate the merits of an eminent domain ordinance aimed at cleaning up blighted properties and vacant lots, the city's building official said Wednesday. It could mirror an ordinance passed earlier this month by Richmond, Ky. leaders.

  • District seeks bank contract

    Thanks to above average interest rate from a local bank, the Shelby County Board of Education earned $1.6 million in interest from their checking account this past year.

    At its Nov. 8 meeting, the board agreed to allow district finical coordinator, Greg Murphy, to present an offer to American Founders Bank that would extend their contract for another year.

  • Simpsonville postpones annexation vote

    The usually sedate Wednesday morning meeting of the Simpsonville City Commission was anything but calm this week as dozens of opponents of annexation of land near I-64 showed up to assault the plan.

  • Triple S considers rule change

    The Shelby County Industrial and Development Foundation submitted a formal objection to proposed changes to the local landscape and buffer zone regulations last night during a public hearing on the subject.

    Ryan Libke, executive director of Triple S, said that although only one person spoke about the change at the meeting, a representative from the industrial foundation handed in a letter voicing their concerns about the changes.

    In the statement, the foundation said that the proposed regulations would hinder local business opportunities.

  • County asks senator for help with illegals

    After a debate about what can be backed up with hard data and what can't, magistrates approved a letter Tuesday to be sent to Republican Senator Jim Bunning asking for help with county problems stemming from illegal immigration.

    Magistrate Michael Riggs said he would like to have statistics to back up any specific comments regarding the effect of the illegal population on county services such as law enforcement, the jail, hospital. clinics and schools.

  • Schools struggle to hire minorities

    Although 26 percent of the students in the Shelby County public school system are from an ethnic minority, only 5 percent of the education positions in the district are filled by minorities, according to a recent report.

  • SCHS student faces weapons charge

    A 16-year-old male was arrested Wednesday and charged with bringing a knife to Shelby County High School and threatening another male student.

    According to a Shelby County Sheriff's report, the boy, who is a junior, made a verbal threat in a classroom involving another student and was taken to the office where administrators then discovered he had a fold-out hunting knife in his possession.

    A note that mentioned the word "murder" was also found in the student's possession, the report said.

  • Math matters: Program aiding Clear Creek

    Math and fun are usually polar opposites in the minds of most children. But in Charlotte Baker's class, students who had been lagging behind in the subject are finding that math adds up and it can be enjoyable.

    Baker, a teacher at Clear Creek elementary, is seeing students excel through a program called Numbers World. Through the program, students learn basic math skills with interactive instruction, activities and worksheets.

  • Mayor: 'Illegal' ID system a state issue

    Mayor Tom Hardesty Tuesday said city-issued IDs and other initiatives hyped by some as potential strategies for validating illegal immigrants should be left up to the state.

    An independent commission tasked with investigating illegal immigration in Lexington last week recommended city leaders there model a photo ID system for its several thousands of suspected undocumented residents after a program in New Haven, Conn.

  • Annexation plan draws protest

    Simpsonville Mayor Steve Eden said critics of the city's plan to annex land near the I-64 interchange with Buckcreek Road have misconceptions about the city's goals for a portion of that land.

    "If they would sit down and talk to us, they would learn that we all want the same thing there," Eden said. "None of us {on the city commission} want heavy equipment there. As long as I'm mayor there won't be heavy equipment on that property, only things that benefit the traveling public."