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Local News

  • Shannon will be grand marshal of Christmas parade

    Businessman Bill Shannon will be the grand marshal of this year's Christmas parade through downtown Shelbyville.

    "He's an icon in the community, runs a family-owned business and was a major part of getting the county's EMS service started," said Shelby County Fire Chief Bobby Cowherd.

    The parade down Main Street gets going at 10 a.m. Dec. 1. Cowherd said floats can start assembling at the fairgrounds at 7:30 a.m. and must be in place by 8:30 for judging. Awards will be presented before the parade gets under way.

  • Berry named county employee of year

    Brandon "Waldo" Berry was named Shelby County Employee of the Year at fiscal court's annual employee service awards banquet Friday night at Claudia Sanders Dinner House.

    "His dedication to his job epitomizes his relationship with the development and progress of his career," said Magistrate Hubert Pollett when he announced the winner. "Not only is Berry respected among his peers at work, but also in his home community of Bagdad."

  • City defers contract after lawsuit concerns

    Shelbyville City Council will defer awarding a more than $73,000 business contract, pending an informal investigation into the certification of a local business.

    Council members split 3-3 last week over the decision to award Arbor View Homes, LLC a contract to install a metal awning at the Weissinger Hills Golf Course clubhouse, after councilman Shane Suttor called for greater scrutiny of the company's owner, Jim Dobson.

    Kentucky Employers' Mutual Insurance Co. recently filed suit against

  • Wills named Farmer of the Year

    John Wills was named Farmer of the Year at the 53rd Farm-City banquet Tuesday.

    Extension Agent for Agriculture Brittany Edelson called Wills "one of the most well-rounded persons to receive the award."

    "He spends incredible amounts of time following ag legislation that impacts locally and nationally," Edelson said. "He advises producers young and old."

    Wills has farmed his entire life in the Rivels area of southern Shelby County. For the last 18 years he has worked for Jacobi Sales. He is the company's service manager. He is active in Shelby County Farm Bureau.

  • Fight against blight

    City officials will debate the merits of an eminent domain ordinance aimed at cleaning up blighted properties and vacant lots, the city's building official said Wednesday. It could mirror an ordinance passed earlier this month by Richmond, Ky. leaders.

  • District seeks bank contract

    Thanks to above average interest rate from a local bank, the Shelby County Board of Education earned $1.6 million in interest from their checking account this past year.

    At its Nov. 8 meeting, the board agreed to allow district finical coordinator, Greg Murphy, to present an offer to American Founders Bank that would extend their contract for another year.

  • Simpsonville postpones annexation vote

    The usually sedate Wednesday morning meeting of the Simpsonville City Commission was anything but calm this week as dozens of opponents of annexation of land near I-64 showed up to assault the plan.

  • Triple S considers rule change

    The Shelby County Industrial and Development Foundation submitted a formal objection to proposed changes to the local landscape and buffer zone regulations last night during a public hearing on the subject.

    Ryan Libke, executive director of Triple S, said that although only one person spoke about the change at the meeting, a representative from the industrial foundation handed in a letter voicing their concerns about the changes.

    In the statement, the foundation said that the proposed regulations would hinder local business opportunities.

  • County asks senator for help with illegals

    After a debate about what can be backed up with hard data and what can't, magistrates approved a letter Tuesday to be sent to Republican Senator Jim Bunning asking for help with county problems stemming from illegal immigration.

    Magistrate Michael Riggs said he would like to have statistics to back up any specific comments regarding the effect of the illegal population on county services such as law enforcement, the jail, hospital. clinics and schools.

  • Schools struggle to hire minorities

    Although 26 percent of the students in the Shelby County public school system are from an ethnic minority, only 5 percent of the education positions in the district are filled by minorities, according to a recent report.