Local News

  • Charles Hurt: March 28, 1961 – September 16, 2016

    With four years on the court for the University of Kentucky followed by a career in the military, former Shelby County basketball star Charles “Atlas” Hurt left his mark on the community, the state and possibly even the world.

    “He was such a great guy,” Shelbyville Mayor Tom Hardesty said.  “He was a wonderful ball player here.”

    Hurt passed away Friday after a long battle with leukemia.

  • Woofstock fundraiser is Saturday

    Every dog will have its day Saturday, at least in Shelby County, when the Woofstock fundraiser gets underway.

    Despite a chance of thunderstorms looming on the horizon, the event will go on, rain or shine, organizers say.

    Cynthia Cottongim, chair of the Woofstock committee, an annual fundraiser for the Shelby County Parks Foundation said that they are hoping for good weather because last year’s event was dampened by rain.

  • County will officially go wet mid Nov.

    Shelby County voters were heard loud and clear Tuesday when they overwhelminly approved packaged alcohol sales be available in the county, passing the special election vote 2,269 for and 802 against.

    The vote will now allow businesses in Shelby County to apply for a liquor license to sell packaged alcohol. The city of Shelbyville has been wet for some time.

    Many in favor of the change saw it as a step in the right direction for economic development.

  • Love, murder and revenge

    Tuesday is the 79th anniversary of an infamous murder case in Shelby County history and one that a Finchville woman has brought back to the forefront of community interest by publishing a book about the incident this summer.

    In her book, Dark Highway, Love, Murder and Revenge in 1930’s Kentucky, Ann DAngelo, who is also an attorney, tells the story of what were actually two murders.

  • Changing lanes

    After recovering from an accident that should have taken his life more than 20 years ago, Shelby resident Conway Witten has since devoted his time to sharing his miraculous experience with others.

  • TRIPLE S PLANNING COMMISSION – Zone change request could make room for another Dollar General

    The Triple S Planning Commission will consider a zone change for the possible development of a new Dollar General when it meets Tuesday at 6:30 at The Stratton Center, 215 Washington Street.  The zone change request, made by property owner Deborah Mulcunry and applicant Susan Cox, is for property located on the north side of Frankfort Road (U.S. 60), just west of Elmburg Road.  The request is to change the zoning of 1.5 acres from Agricultural (A) to General Commercial (C-3).

  • Developer sues city

    A development company has brought suit against the City of Shelbyville alleging that officials have unjustly continued to condemn an historic building under renovation to become a restaurant.

    The suit, filed in Shelby Circuit Court Sept. 8 by Wise Capital Management Company, names the city, Mayor Tom Hardesty and Code Enforcement Officer Barry Edington.

  • Police chase ends with crash on U.S. 60

    A police chase that began in Franklin County Wednesday afternoon ended in Shelby County when the fleeing vehicle crashed into a guardrail in the 3000 block of U.S., said police.

    Shelby County Sheriff's detective Maj. Jason Rice said that his department assisted in apprehending all three persons who jumped out of the vehicle and ran when they crashed.

    There was only one minor injury in the crash.

    Rice said the congestion should clear up by rush hour.

  • Augustine sentenced to 7 years with probation

    Theresa M. Augustine, a former assistant administrator and firefighter who was indicted in February 2015 on theft-related charges, received a 7-year sentence with probation in Shelby Circuit Court Friday.

    Augustine pleaded guilty in July to the original charges – theft by unlawful taking $10,000 or more, but less than $100,000 – as well as abuse of public trust in connection with that amount.

    Both charges are Class C felonies, which carry a prison sentence of 5 to 10 years each.

  • Farm tour sites encompass Shelby County

    If you want to get a true feel for what agriculture is all about in Shelby County, you don’t want to miss the 4th Annual Good Neighbors Farm Tour Saturday.

    The event will encompass 9 farms and 60 miles of agricultural activity from livestock, poultry, grain to wine making and even a miniature ninja warrior’s course for the kids.

    You’ll even be able to taste fresh farm products ranging from the sweet ice cream and honey to fresh vegetables and fruit wine to savory pork, lamb and beef.