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Local News

  • Clerk, Sheriff excess fees grow

    The Shelby County Clerk and the Shelby County Sheriff’s offices both Tuesday turned in excess fees to the Shelby County Fiscal Court for 2016 in amounts larger than they submitted for the previous year.

    Shelby County Clerk Sue Carole Perry turned $244,446 in for 2016, compared to $227,137 for 2015. Shelby County Sheriff Mike Armstrong saw an even bigger increase, turning in $319,607, compared to $260,081 for 2015.

  • Senate passes campus tobacco ban

    The senate last week passed legislation that would outlaw the use of all tobacco products, by students and visiting adults, on school properties and on school sponsored trips.

    Currently 62 of the state’s 173 districts already have tobacco free policies. While Shelby County is not a completely tobacco-free district, there are policies in place that prohibit the use of tobacco products in any building owned or operated by the board.

  • Statewide tornado drill is Tuesday

    The calendar might say February, but the forecast feels more like April showers and May flowers.

    With weather teetering in the 70s this week, anyone holding onto the dream of snow should put those weather wishes on hold and start making plans for the next season – which includes inclement weather.

  • TRIPLE S PLANNING COMMISSION County’s population growing

    On Tuesday, Triple S Executive Director Ryan Libke told the commission that data indicates the population in Shelby County is on a steady rise.

    Libke presented the report for January and said the month was a slower than what they had experienced in a while but February is making up for it.

    “February has turned out to be the better month than January and the year before January was better than February,” he said.

  • Judge denies temporary injunction for solar plant

    A Franklin Circuit judge has ruled against a request for a temporary injunction to prevent the construction of a project to build a solar energy field in Simpsonville.

    Judge Phillip J. Shepherd ruled Tuesday [Feb. 21] to deny the request filed by Gerald Karem, a property owner who lives near the site.

    Shepherd said in his ruling that the court may only grant a temporary injunction where it is clearly shown that the applicant’s rights are being violated or will suffered injury or loss.

  • Shelby’s immigrant population joins protest

    Shelby County businesses felt the impact Thursday of the “A Day Without Immigrants” protest, when activists called on immigrants to protest President Donald Trump's tough stance on immigration by staying home from work or school. That also included not shopping and not eating out, in an effort to highlight the vital role they play in U.S. society

  • Historical society gets grant to revamp archives

    It may not be a large amount of money, but $500 will go a long way toward connecting Shelby’s future with the past.

    The Shelby County Historical Society received the grant last week, along with similar grants made to 17 other Kentucky counties, from the Kentucky Local History Trust Fund.

    The goal was to help the state’s local historical societies to make better use of their resources, increase membership and generally move forward.

  • SHELBY COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD Board to review progress toward goals

    On Thursday the board will hear an update on the on the 2016-2017 board goals, which were set last April. 

  • Highlighting history

    Nearly packed to capacity, the cafeteria at Northside Early Childhood Center Sunday overflowed with community members eager to learn more about Shelbyville’s African American history during the annual Community Tapestry event.

    Sponsored by the Shelby County Historical Society, the event each year showcases a portion of our community’s African American history through exhibits and speakers and this year the spotlight was on that of former and current service members.

  • SHELBY COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD District revamps facility plans

    The Shelby County Board of Education convened Thursday for a special called meeting to discuss future facility plans for the district.

    The district highlighted a handful of needs that would require construction to accommodate.