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Local News

  • Man sues after genital amputation

    A Waddy man and his wife are suing two doctors who they say amputated the man's penis without his consent.

    Phillip and Deborah Seaton filed a malpractice suit in Shelby County Circuit Court last week against Dr. John Patterson of Frankfort, who performed the surgery, and Dr. Oliver James of Shelbyville, who administered anesthetic to Seaton.

  • Clear Creek gets rehab, still closed to the public

    Officials have a partial answer about what has happened to Clear Creek and are in the process of devising a plan to correct the situation, according to state environmental inspector Clark Dorman.

    "We are working on that as we speak," he said.

    Dorman said the fill kill in the creek was determined to be caused from a lack of oxygen in the water, in addition to some other things.

  • Drug search turns up 20 pot plants

    Officers found an unusually large number of marijuana plants at a residence during a drug bust just north of Finchville last week.

    According to Shelby County Sheriff's detective Jason Rice, when deputies arrived at the residence at 3121 Veechdale Road, they discovered 20 plants of what Rice described as being of "very high quality."

    "Each plant was worth at least the normal value of what is usually grown around here," he said.

    Rice said the marijuana contained a high THC content, and he estimated the street value of the plants at about $50,000.

  • School board reviews how to spend new funds

    After passing a hefty tax increase last month, the Shelby County School Board on Thursday will consider approving a plan for how to spend that money.

    The board recently approved a tax increase on real and personal property that is expected to give the district an additional $1.4 million in revenue.

    And with the estimated revenues and expenditures calculated, the board will hear and consider approving the working budget for the 2008/09 school year.

  • Remembering Eric

    One of the most painful things that a father might ever have to do is to give the eulogy at his own son's funeral.

    Christopher Wilson now knows that pain.

    Friday night, just five days after his son, Frederic, was tragically killed in a violent windstorm, Christopher told the more than 200 people who gathered for boy's funeral that his son would be remembered for his compassion and love.

    "As a father, I am not impartial, but I think those who knew him know how special he was," he said. "My life changed the day he was born."

  • Creek raises a stink: Source of odor, dead fish a mystery

    Residents in the vicinity of Third Street and Governor's Square Shopping Center have been smelling something foul in the air, and they want to know what's causing it.

    Since Sunday they've been reporting the bad odor and dead fish floating in Clear Creek, and local and state experts still are trying to determine their sources.

  • Investigation closes Clear Creek to public - Dead fish, smell force recreational quarantine

    The problem of odor, black water and dead fish continues to puzzle environmental officials, who have been combing the Clear Creek area for answers.

    Clark Dorman, a state environmental inspector called in by local officials, said Friday that until they figure out what is wrong with the creek, no one will be allowed there.

    We dont want people in there swimming or fishing or doing anything else until we determine what is going on there, Dorman said.

  • Celebrating the constitution: Secretary of State visits Heritage Elementary

    As Kentucky's Secretary of State, one of Trey Grayson's top priorities is to ensure that many of the freedoms guaranteed in the U.S. Constitution are experienced here in the Commonwealth.

    That's not an easy job.

    This past Wednesday, Grayson was given an equally challenging task of explaining those constitutional freedoms to second- and fifth- grade students at Heritage Elementary School.

    Grayson came to Heritage on Wednesday morning to celebrate Constitution Day, a day set aside by the U.S. Congress to remember the document that established this country.

  • Hurricane blows Rockets back on the road

    The wind stopped blowing Sunday evening, but Hurricane Ivan is still wreaking havoc.

    When Jefferson County Public Schools decided to cancel all activities for the week because of damage from the storm, Shelby County High School and several other schools were left scrambling to fill open weeks in the football schedule.

    That meant Doss wouldn't be SCHS's guest for tonight's scheduled home opener.

    Instead, the Rockets will travel to Johnson Central for the season's third game. The home opener will now be Oct. 3 against Manual.

  • Pain at the pump: Fuel prices have consumers over a barrel

    The awesome power of the hurricane-force winds didn't just pummel trees and power lines over the weekend. It also helped batter bankrolls at the gas pump.

    Many oil refineries in Texas and Louisiana were still feeling the effects of Hurricane Gustav from a few weeks ago, and when Hurricane Ike blew through, gas prices blew up in anticipation of further damage to oil rigs, refineries and power outages.