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Local News

  • City puts liquor tax on ice

    The controversial liquor tax has reached its end in Shelbyville.

    With a 5-1 vote on its second reading, an ordinance repealing the alcohol sales regulatory license fee was approved by the Shelbyville City Council. Although the vote took place on Thursday, the ordinance actually cut off the alcohol tax at the end of last year.

    The ordinance states "the fee shall be canceled for all alcohol sales on or after January 1, 2008."

  • Interviews held for superintendent

    The Shelby County Board of Education conducted their first interview with a candidate for the vacant superintendent position last Thursday morning.

    In the next two weeks the board will have interviews with four more candidates. They are expected to announce the new superintendent by the end of April.

    The board received 27 applications for the position by the end of February and a search committee slimmed the field down to five last month.

  • Shelby native honored as Nurse of the Year at Norton Suburban

    Shelbyville native Pamela Mays has been awarded the honor of Norton Suburban Hospital's 2008 Nurse of the Year in Louisville.

    Mays, formerly Pamela Stucker, was nominated by a group of fellow nurses for her excellence as a labor and delivery nurse, her positive attitude and for her dedicated work training new hires.

    "I'm also an International Board Certified Lactation Consultant," she said.

    "And that was one of the reasons why I got nominated, too. I helped bring a lactation program to Suburban."

  • Tests identify ham as likely source of foodbourne illness

    Tests by the Kentucky State Lab on food from Claudia Sanders appeared to confirm initial suspicions: The bacteria that sickened about 140 people at the restaurant Easter Sunday may have been from city ham.

  • A united purpose

    A coalition of community leaders and local elected officials gathered together last week to cast a vision of how they would like to see Shelby County improve in the future.

    The meeting, which was organized by Metro United Way, brought together bank presidents, school teachers, government officials, representatives from several local non-profit agencies and one local news reporter.

  • Local golf enthusiast/amputee dies in accident

    A local man, well-known locally for helping amputees lead productive lives, was killed Tuesday in an accident.

    Henry Brown, 70, of Waddy, was killed early Tuesday morning as he was trying to load a farm tractor onto a trailer at Miles Farm Service.

    Shelby County Deputy Sheriff Tim Gilbert said when he got to the scene of the accident that Brown was being loaded into an ambulance. He said it was his understanding that the tractor, which had a grass-seeder attached, turned over, fatally injuring Brown.

  • SCHS get federal grant

    Shelby County High School has been selected as one of 12 schools across the state to receive a $350,000 federal grant to establish advanced math, science and English classes for local students.

  • Courthouse sidewalk project set to start

    It is not swimming pool status yet, but the basement of the courthouse has occasionally had standing water on the east side from rain running down the sidewalk.

    That may end soon.

    At the fiscal court meeting Tuesday, magistrates agreed to a bid by Gra Kat Construction to repair the sidewalk alongside the courthouse and put in storm drainage that should fix the leaking problem.

  • Local man jailed for several thefts

    A Shelbyville man has been arrested in connection with several thefts, according to Detective Jason Rice with the Shelbyville Sheriff's Office.

    David Wayne Lockard, 29, of 68 Lovall Lane in Shelbyville, was arrested April 1 in connection with a residential burglary in which several appliances were taken on Easter Sunday.

    He has been charged with second-degree burglary in that incident. Also, Rice said that after his arrest, Lockard confessed to several thefts at Lowe's in January, which had been caught on video surveillance tape.

  • Restoring an American giant

    On a hillside patch of fescue and orchardgrass near Finchville, a group of volunteers are laboring to restore an American icon.

    One hole at a time, one hundred holes altogether, on one acre of ground, they are planting a breeding orchard for the American chestnut tree. The tree, once the dominant species of the eastern forest, is almost gone. Few people alive today have seen an American chestnut tree; even fewer remember when it reigned as the supreme tree of the forest. A blight that started in New York over 100 years ago wiped out the great chestnut forests.