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Local News

  • Local officials named to state HVMAT commission

    Two local officials have been appointed to a state commission that oversees the handling of hazardous materials across the state.

    Gov. Steve Beshear has named Shelby County Judge-Executive Rob Rothenburger and Charlie Frazee, the director of local Emergency Management Agency, to the Kentucky Emergency Response Commission.

    Both men said being named to the commission is an honor.

  • Police report significant drop in crime

    City police say that so far this year, the local crime rate has dropped significantly.

    Shelbyville Police Chief Robert Schutte said that statistics comparing the first six months of last year with this year show a 36 percent drop in the city's crime rate.

    He added that the decrease is not in any one area, but across the board.

    "I'm talking about everything," he said. "Part I crimes are your major crimes, like murder, rape, robbery and assault, larceny. Part II crimes are shoplifting and so forth. It's all down. It's a good thing."

  • Court order buries cemetery

    Circuit Judge Charles Hickman signed a court order July 8 nullifying a conditional use permit that would have allowed a Louisville company to develop a cemetery in an agricultural area in northern Shelby County.

    Hickman's order voided a conditional use permit Louisville Cemetery Association had obtained from the Triple S Planning and Zoning Board of Adjustments and Appeals that allowed the company to build a cemetery, including mausoleums, on land off Eminence Pike.

  • Teen hit by a car while skateboarding

    A local teen remains hospitalized after being hit by a car while skateboarding last Friday night, according to the Shelby County Sheriff's Office.

    Stefan Miller, 16, of Shelbyville, is still in intensive care at Kosair Children's Hospital after being struck by a car in the 100th block of Eminence Pike last Friday night at 10:17 p.m.

  • Snafu snarls bypass construction - Burks Branch stays closed to through traffic

    With his hands on his hips, Carl Henry snorted in frustration.

    "They're telling me now it will be closed until the middle of August, and if they come back and tell me it won't be open until December, I wouldn't be surprised," he said.

  • Free dental clinic to open - Back to school screenings this Saturday

    A free dental clinic will open this Saturday with a back-to-school screening for children from low-income families.

    The clinic, which is run by Operation Care, will help address dental health, what many local leaders consider one of the most pressing issues in the community.

    Judy Roberts, executive director of Operation Care, said the clinic has been in the planning stages for over three years.

    She said the years of planning and preparation will pay off when the clinic starts helping the people in the community who daily suffer because of a lack of dental treatment.

  • Summer in the wild

    The difference between being lost in the woods and simply having an adventure often comes down to having the right equipment and the right training.

    The equipment can be bought easily enough, but the know-how has to be learned from a book or taught by people like local outdoorsmen Joe Franzen and Bryce Stella.

    During the school year, Franzen and Stella help their students at West Middle School get an education in the subjects such as world history and science, subject they most certainly will need to master to survive in high school and college.

  • Coleman's legacy remembered

    More than 200 people came to Calvary Cemetery in Shelbyville last Friday afternoon to honor the life of the Rev. Louis Coleman.

    Coleman, who died on July 5 of a seizure attack, was one of the loudest voices for equal rights here locally and across the state.

    Although Coleman was from Louisville, he led a church here locally and developed a love for Shelby County. Through decades of service in the community, he has left a legacy.

    Brenda Jackson, Shelby County School Board chair, said Coleman's dedication and service are an example to follow for future generations.

  • Appointment leads to battle (on court)

    At the fiscal court meeting Tuesday, magistrates appointed a new paramedic/administrative major to Emergency Services -- a position that has been surrounded by controversy over the hiring process.

    When the opening for the position was announced in May, two fiscal court magistrates, Cordy Armstrong and Allen Ruble, had allegedly stated at a public meeting that a particular employee be fired and another should be hired to provide funding for the deputy EMS director's position.

  • Schools to have interim principals

    Two local schools will have interim principals at their helm next school year.

    Late last month, Gary Kidwell and Lisa Smith, former principals at Shelby County High School and Painted Stone Elementary School respectively, left their posts to take jobs with the school district's central office.

    Due to the short period of time between the principals leaving the schools and the start of the school year, interim principals will have to be appointed for next school year.