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Local News

  • Dystonia event Saturday

    Having a rare disease is scary. Having doctors not know how to treat you can be terrifying.

    Just ask Jennifer Heil. Before she was being properly diagnosed with Dystonia, Heil went to see four doctors and lived through months of pain.

    Dystonia, which is a neurological disorder that is characterized by repetitive muscle contractions, can cause the twisting and jerking movement of the body.

    Heil said the disease causes all of the muscles in her face, neck, back and stomach to constrict.

  • Goal: Removing the barriers to education

    In his first official act as superintendent, James Neihof got to hand out diplomas to over 300 seniors at the graduation ceremony last Friday night.

    Neihof, who took office on Monday, said seeing all of the Shelby County High School students receive a certificate for 12 years of successful education reminded him of why he wanted to be superintendent of Shelby County Public Schools.

    "This is why we do what we do," he said. "To see those kids succeed in school and be prepared to excel in whatever they go on to next."

  • Yard sale to help family

    A community yard sale will be held this weekend to help cover the medical costs of a local woman who was hurt in a car accident five years.

    In 2003, Carmela Cox was in an automobile accident that caused a massive stroke. The trauma caused her to lose the use of her left arm and much of her ability to walk.

    The money raised from the yard sale will be used to offset medical expenses.

  • Commission hoping for 'downtown' Simpsonville

    The Simpsonville City Commission Tuesday formally asked Triple S Planning and Zoning to conduct a study on how the city can create a downtown district.

    "We're asking zoning to do a small-area study to create a downtown district," Simpsonville Mayor Steve Eden said. "We know this is a 20-to-40-year project, but we want to lay the groundwork now."

  • Insects could be bugging ash trees

    Here and there around the county, one can see large blue or purplish objects hanging in trees.

    What are they?

    All types of speculation has abounded, from people thinking they could be something to kill mesquites, to thinking they were beehives, posters to promote a special event, or even a type of kite.

    But it turns out that they are actually devices to trap the emerald ash borer, a small green insect that feeds on ash trees.

  • Making racing safer

    Saturday, Big Brown may make it to the pinnacle of thoroughbred racing and become the first Triple Crown winner in 30 years.

    For some concerned trainers, owners and farriers in the thoroughbred racing industry, tomorrow may also be another day closer to uncovering the cause and effects of horse-related injuries.

    Mitch Taylor, owner of Kentucky Horse Shoeing Academy in Mount Eden and a certified journeyman farrier in the American Farrier's Association, is researching why racehorses break down on and off the track.

  • Call sparks false lead; Ethington still missing

    Although no new information has surfaced about Maxine Ethington, who has been missing for nearly two weeks, police investigated a lead Wednesday that did not pan out, according to Shelbyville Police Chief Robert Schutte.

    "We received a call at 2:21 in the afternoon from a gentleman in the cemetery who thought he saw something in the creek," he said.

    The chief explained that the caller had been visiting Grove Hill Cemetery and saw what he thought could be a vehicle in the creek. But when police arrived and checked it out, it turned out to be an abandoned shopping cart.

  • Watch for collectors, Crusade broadcast

    Simpsonville Fire Chief Walter Jones likes to get a head start on collecting money for the Crusade for Children. On Tuesday night his troops were already manning the buckets at the intersection of U. S. 60 and Buck Creek Road.

    This weekend, including today, the county's seven fire departments will make the final push for collections. They hope to top last year's countywide total of just under $187,000. Local fire chiefs are asking drivers to be on the alert for collections at the county's major intersections.

  • Board sets conditions for horse arena

    The Triple S Board of Adjustment and Appeals set down nine conditions along with the Conditional Use Permit (CUP) it gave to Rocky Fork Feeders at the board's May 29 meeting.

    Rocky Fork Feeders' owner Mike McIntosh is building a 60,000-plus square foot building on his farm on Dover Road to accommodate events held by the Kentucky Cutting Horse Associaton. Those events had previously been held at the Shelby County Fairgrounds.

  • A cross to bear

    When Rod Purves retired from the Navy after 22 years of service, he decided to take up his cross - literally.

    The California man left Newport Beach, Calif. Sept. 14 of last year bound for Washington, D. C. where he will take part in a pro-life rally on Aug. 16. Purves is carrying to the rally crosses he has made along the way, crosses covered with thousands of supporters' signatures he has gathered on his route.