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Local News

  • Fire destroys Fisherville Road home

    Shortly before noon Wednesday, firefighters battled a blaze at a home located at 5856 Fisherville Road.

    Simpsonville Fire Chief Walter Jones said the call came in at about 11:19 a.m. that a structure fire was in progress.

    Firefighters arrived to find flames shooting from the upper floor of the two-story home.

    The home is owned by Kurt Swigert, Jones said.

    Swigert was not living in the home at the time of the blaze but Jones said several Hispanic residents who do work for him had been staying in the house. They were not injured.

  • Will Kentuckians get to vote on casinos?

    When Gov. Steve Beshear presented his plan to the General Assembly last week, he told legislators he wants to put the question to voters on the November 2008 ballot.

    "I trust the people in this state to make the right decision," he said.

    But getting the question on the ballot by this fall is not as simple as it sounds.

    To allow casino gambling, three-fifths of both the House and the Senate in the Kentucky General Assembly would have to approve a constitutional amendment. The legislature is already half-way through this year's session.

  • Casinos: A crapshoot?

    If Joy Bolton, of Shelbyville, has her way, women will lead the crusade against expanded gambling in the state just as mothers led the battle to toughen the nation's drunk driving laws.

    "We see ourselves like the women who founded MADD (Mothers Against Drunk Driving)," Bolton said. "They were tired of their children being killed on the highways. We are tired of families being disrupted by problem gambling. The social costs of expanded gambling are not worth it. It is government sanctioning behavior that is detrimental for the sake of additional revenue."

  • Promotion key to Recycling Center's growth

    Word of mouth has been the best advertisement when it comes to getting Shelby County residents to recycle.

    Shelby County Solid Waste Coordinator Russell Thomas credits promoting the Recycling Center's mission to the public for much of the increase in the county's 2007 recycling totals.

    "Getting the word out is important," Thomas said. "I think our efforts -- and it is a team effort -- in getting out in community and spreading the word has helped tremendously."

  • Simpsonville law would speed up nuisance enforcement

    The Simpsonville City Commission Wednesday passed an ordinance that would speed up the city's ability to deal with environmental nuisances.

    The ordinance amends a 1986 measure that required a letter to a homeowner followed by a certified letter before the city could take action to require a property to be mowed or cleaned up. The new rule allows the city to take action after it has informed the property owner by certified letter or by a personal visit.

    City public works director Brian Romine said the new rule would make his job easier.

  • Family court will stay put for time being

    Family Court Judge John David Myles will have to wait for the new judicial center to be built before he gets to move his office.

    The Administrative Office of the Courts (AOC) had been in negotiations with New Mount Zion Church to lease the Mulberry Building at 7th and Main streets to renovate that building into office space and a courtroom. But renovating the space would be cost-prohibitive given that the court will be moving into the new judicial center when it is built.

  • A dog's life

    "I love it. Absolutely love it!" is the sentiment Christine Swartz, of Shepherdsville, has of the SuperDog Sports Center in Simpsonville.

    She drives an hour at least once a week to get to the SuperDog Sports Center in Simpsonville to train her Rhodesian Ridgeback, Chase. The dog, a handsome male and show winner, participates in the center's classes to improve and maintain his show presentation.

  • Council repents 'sin tax'

    The Shelbyville City Council came to a consensus last Thursday night that they would move to rescind the five percent tax on local alcohol sales.

    After a workshop on Feb. 14 concerning the tax, five of the six council members said they were in favor of getting rid of the tax and giving the close to $50,000 that the tax has earned back to the businesses that sold the alcohol.

    During the workshop, Shelbyville Mayor Tom Hardesty told council members the city took in twice as much in alcohol taxes as it had anticipated.

  • County reviews weather warnings

    Why did the tornado sirens go off after the tornado had already passed through some areas of the county?

    Why didn't the Bagdad and Cropper areas hear anything on TV weather reports about the tornado in their area until after it had already hit?

    Magistrates raised questions such as these about the way tornado sirens are activated at its regular Tuesday morning meeting.

  • USDA recalls beef at local schools

    Workers for the Shelby County public school system collected close to 130 cases of ground beef from areas schools on Tuesday after the U.S. Department of Agriculture deemed the meat "unfit for human food."

    The beef that was recalled locally was part of a nationwide recall of meat that was processed at the Hallmark/Westland Meat Packing Company in Chino, California. In total, the U.S. Department of Agriculture announced a recall of close to 37 million pounds of beef on Sunday.