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Local News

  • Heritage gets parking relief

    Shelby County's worst school related traffic jam is finally close to being resolved.

    Construction workers at Heritage Elementary School have been working feverishly in recent weeks to finish a car-rider loop and parking lot project before the start of school.

    And with students set to show up for class in just seven days, the completion of the project is going to come right down to the wire.

    Kerry Whitehouse, assistant superintendent for operations, said he is 98.9 percent confident that the project will be completed before the first day of school.

  • Cornerstone shuffles administration

    Citing difficult financial times, Cornerstone Christian Academy has decided to cut back its administrative positions and has let go one of its longtime educators.

    Jody League, who was the school's principal for the past three years, lost his job earlier this month when the school's board of directors decided to combine the roles of principal and school administrator in order to save money.

    Phil Miller, the chairman of the board of directors, said a dip in student enrollment caused shortfalls in the school's budget, which had to be addressed.

  • Seven arrested in street brawl; robbery

    A group of Hispanics have been arrested and are awaiting deportation in connection with a mass robbery and brawl that occurred on July 24.

    According to Shelbyville Police, a group of seven armed Hispanics, four men and three women, robbed a number of people in the 800 block of Washington Street shortly before 8 p.m.

    Shelbyville Police Chief Robert Schutte said that police officer Frank Willoughby was driving down Washington Street when he saw a group of people fighting in a parking lot.

  • Remembering the Holocaust: Louisville resident tells her tale

    "It's not the happiest story, but it's true," Ann Klein told the women of the Caryatid Book Club after sharing her story with them last Thursday.

    The women had gathered at club-member Linda Scearce's house to hear Klein, a resident of Louisville, talk about her horrific experiences as a Jew in Europe during the Holocaust. They listened quietly with the occasional gasp, some wiping away tears, stunned not only by her sad tale but also by her smile. They told her this and she replied that though she has plenty to cry about, she survived.

    So she smiles.

  • Fire destroys log cabin

    Fire investigators are still trying to determine what sparked a fire that destroyed a log cabin on Eminence Pike Tuesday morning.

    Shelby County Fire Chief Bobby Cowherd said the building's compact design and wooden walls allowed the to fire spread quickly through the 250 square-foot log cabin.

    The building, which was located at 1951 Eminence Pike, was unoccupied when the blaze began. No one was injured in the fire.

    The report of the fire was made to 911 dispatch at 8:45 a.m. At that time flames were already shooting out of the windows of the building.

  • Workshop coming for golf cart alternative

    Giving residents the option of driving golf carts on city streets has been on Shelbyville City Council member Shane Suttor's mind for a while. Now the city council is planning to hold a workshop in the near-future to brainstorm and seriously consider the option.

  • Here we go! Shelbyville Horse Show runs tonight through Saturday

    Mix one part showmanship, one part competition and one part socializing and you have a pretty good recipe for the Shelbyville Horse Show.

    This year's show is all business and competition for the owners, trainers, breeders and riders of the saddlebreds and hackney ponies that will compete in the dozens of classes tonight through Friday, with the championship classes running on Saturday.

  • And they're off: Breakfast kicks off Jubilee, horse show

    The World Equestrian Games in 2010 will take place nearly 60 miles away at the Kentucky Horse Park, but U. S. Equestrian Federation CEO John Long said Shelby County can expect to reap economic and public relations benefits.

    "People will be coming here from all over the world to look at property, to look at horses, to look at your wonderful downtown with all of the antique windows," Long said. "We can showcase the beauty of the county. It's an opportunity to do literally whatever we want to do."

  • Shipley named as interim principal

    There are few people in the county who love Painted Stone Elementary School more than Michelle Shipley.

    For the past two years, Shipley was the first person that many students saw when they got off the bus in the morning and the last person they waved to as they went home.

    When the buses roll in for the first day of school on Aug. 6, the students will address Shipley with a new title--principal.

    Shipley was named as the interim principal for next school year by Superintendent James Neihof on Wednesday afternoon.

  • Help CASA help the children

    There are currently eight Court Appointed Special Advocate (CASA) volunteers, and according to Beverly Hilger, there is a great need for more.

    Hilger, coordinator of Volunteer Advocates in Shelby and Spencer Counties, said CASA volunteers have aided 20 abused or neglected children in its first six months in Shelby and Spencer Counties. But with 125 children in out-of-home-care in these counties, she said CASA needs more volunteers to extend its impact.