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Local News

  • Parkinson support group set to start

    "Everyone has a thorn in the side," said Shelbyville resident Alton Webb. "Parkinson happens to be mine."

    What Webb describes as a "thorn" in his side is Parkinson's Disease--a chronic, progressive, neurological disorder, symptoms of which include hand tremor, slowness of movement, limb stiffness, and difficulty with gait and balance.

    A thorn indeed.

    Even though there is no cure for this disease, there is medication that can help somewhat with treating some of the symptoms of the disease, which can be very debilitating.

  • Two named to Heritage Council

    Two local residents have been named to the most prominent cultural preservation council in the state.

    Stephen L. Collins and Darlene J. Brown, both of Shelbyville, have been appointed by Gov. Steve Beshear to the Kentucky Heritage Council.

    The council, which is tasked with identifying, preserving and protecting the cultural resources of Kentucky, is made up of 16 members from across the state.

    The council members work to preserve the buildings, structures, farms and landmarks in Kentucky that are historically significant.

  • Young challenges Montell to debates

    Bill Young, democratic candidate for Kentucky's House District 58, held a press conference Wednesday to challenge incumbent Brad Montell to a series of four debates.

    Two of the debates would be in Shelby County and two would be held in Spencer County, Young said, with one in each county being an open-ended forum allowing the audience to ask questions, which is something he thinks people want to be able to do.

  • SCHS band under new direction

    The rhythms, melodies and block rocking beats that the Shelby County High School band is known for are back again this school year.

    Along with a slew of new songs and routines for home athletic events and band competitions, the band also has a new director this year.

    Jenny Van Tiem took over as director of the band towards the end of the band camp in late July. In the four weeks Van Tiem has been on the job, she has been busy getting to know the students and boosters and getting the band ready to perform.

  • Pentagon survivor speaks about Sept. 11

    The microphone he was using wasn't necessary as Sgt. Maj. Tony Rose took a deep breath and began to talk about the horrific events of Sept. 11, 2001.

    Total silence blanketed the banquet room at Claudia Sanders Thursday as Rose spoke to the Shelbyville Board of Realtors at their annual meeting Thursday.

    "Where were you that day?" he asked. "Close your eyes. Can you see it?"

    Rose, an Elizabethtown resident, was at his desk at the Pentagon when American Airlines flight 77 slammed into the building and exploded directly under his second floor office.

  • Shelby to celebrate Labor Day

    As summer nears its end, the first Monday of September marks Labor Day - a day when we celebrate the achievements of American workers.

    Leading the celebration in Shelbyville is Shelbyville-Shelby County branch of NAACP with its annual pageant and parade.

  • A new-fangled way to cut tobacco

    Ray Tucker was cutting tobacco on his farm Tuesday morning. But rather than stooping, swinging, lifting and spearing, he was driving a machine that was doing the backbreaking work for him.

    Tucker is experimenting with a mechanical tobacco harvester manufactured by the Kirpy Company of France that cuts the plant, notches it and lays it on a wagon gentle as a baby. Rather than a field full of workers swinging tomahawks and spearing plants on sticks, cutting with the Kirpy requires one to drive the tractor and another worker to pull a wagon alongside.

  • City real estate taxes stay even; Personal tax rates drop

    At its August 21 meeting, the Shelbyville City Council approved the first reading of an ordinance levying ad valorem property tax rates for the calendar year of 2008.

    The tax rate proposed this year is 27.5 cents per $100.00 assessed real property. The rate is the same as last year, and is expected to produce about $1.9 million in revenue. Last year it produced just over $1.8 million.

    The tax rate on personal property within the city will be reduced from 46.8 cents on each $100.00 of assessed value last year, to 43.1 cents this year.

  • School board to consider tax increase

    Shelby County property owners could see an increase in taxes next year.

    The Shelby County Board of Education will hold a public hearing on the proposed tax increases this Thursday night in order to receive public comment on the .5 percent increase on real property and .2 percent increase on personal property.

    Superintendent James Neihof said the increases are in line with past tax increases, state law, and are consistent with the "cost of living" increases that the district has experienced.

  • Local Democrat attends DNC

    One of the youngest delegates at this week's Democratic National Convention got hooked on politics while sitting in a government class at Shelby County High School.

    Arshiya Saiyed, who graduated from SCHS in 2006, said her path to representing Kentucky at the DNC began when her teacher, Phillip Bell, made politics come alive in class.

    "Through his classes and having lively debates with classmates, I learned the importance of political involvement," she said.