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Local News

  • Semi flips on I-64; driver injured

    The driver of a tractor-trailer was injured Monday morning when his vehicle overturned on Interstate I-64 West.

    Brian Stradford, 40, of North Carolina, was treated and released from Jewish Hospital Shelbyville for injuries he sustained when his rig left the roadway and turned over on the grass, spilling a full load of scrap metal and rupturing a fuel tank.

    Simpsonville Fire Chief Walter Jones, whose department responded to the accident that happened at the 26-mile marker, said that Haz-Mat teams cleaned up the diesel spill of about 60 gallons.

  • Man charged for pointing gun at his neighbor

    A Bagdad-area man who is the pastor of a church in Louisville was indicted for pointing a loaded gun at his neighbor.

    Richard Miller of Cedarmore Road was indicted Sept. 17 in Shelby County District Court on a charge of second-degree wanton endangerment, a misdemeanor.

    The incident happened on July 24, when Miller allegedly pointed a loaded pistol at Dana Duncan, a next-door neighbor.

    Miller is scheduled to be arraigned in Shelby District Court on Tuesday.

    Miller said Duncan filed charges against him after the altercation.

  • SCHS names new athletics director

    Shelby County High School has named girls' basketball coach Sally Zimmerman the school's new athletics director Friday.

    The change came about when Assistant Principal Don Harding left the school in August to become the principal at the Educational Facility at Cropper. Steve Coleman, then athletics director, replaced Harding at the high school.

    Zimmerman will continue to coach the Lady Rockets this season before finding a replacement next year.

    See the full story in Wednesday's Sentinel-News.

  • Semi flips; driver injured

    The driver of a tractor-trailer was injured Monday morning when his vehicle overturned on Interstate I-64 West.

    Brian Stradford, 40, of North Carolina, was transported to Jewish Hospital Shelbyville for injuries he sustained when his rig left the roadway and turned over on the grass, spilling a full load of scrap metal and rupturing a fuel tank.

    Simpsonville Fire Chief Walter Jones, whose department responded to the accident that happened at the 26-mile marker, said that Haz-Mat teams cleaned up the diesel spill of about 60 gallons.

  • Wall Street shakes Main Street

    723 miles.

    That's how far Wall Street is from downtown Shelbyville.

    That might seem like a long way, but the proposed $700 billion bailout of failing mortgage finance companies will hit pretty close to home.

    It would cost taxpayers in Shelby County alone $80 million.

    Some people are calling Wall Street's current financial crisis the worst since The Great Depression, causing many nationally and locally to question the wisdom of the bailout and the overall financial stability of the country.

  • Bypass construction on schedule

    Carl Henry was smiling big because he good news to report about the progress with construction of the Shelbyville Bypass.

    "Burks Branch is back open again," he said. "And it's about time."

    State officials said no further delays are anticipated and that the entire, $26.1million project is on schedule to be completed by August 2009.

    "Right now, the excavation work is done, and almost all the bridge road work is also done," said Andrea Clifford, spokesperson for the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet. "We have one more concrete pour coming up on Tuesday."

  • Couple describes shock, trauma of genital removal

    Phillip Seaton struggled to control his emotions with difficulty as he talked about waking up from surgery to discover he no longer had a penis.

    Seaton, 61, said he went into Jewish Hospital Shelbyville in last October to have a simple circumcision to have his foreskin removed because the excess skin was contributing to what he was told was some type of infection on the tip of his penis.

    "The doctor knew that's all that was supposed to be done," he said Friday. "We even joked about it, like, don't take off too much."

  • Wall Street shakes Main Street

    723 miles.

    That's how far Wall Street is from downtown Shelbyville.

    That might seem like a long way, but the proposed $700 billion bailout of failing mortgage finance companies will hit pretty close to home.

    It would cost taxpayers in Shelby County alone $80 million.

    Some people are calling Wall Street's current financial crisis the worst since The Great Depression, causing many nationally and locally to question the wisdom of the bailout and the overall financial stability of the country.

  • Myles: Cops can't carry into court

    Like most judges, John David Myles doesn't want guns to be brought into his courtroom. But, unlike most judges, Myles has even prohibited law-enforcement officers from packing heat in his courtroom.

    And the decision has caused several local police officers to be up in arms.

    Myles, who is the Family Court judge, said his decision is for the safety of those in the court.

  • Martinrea to cut 84 workers

    Martinrea Heavy Stamping, continuing to battle the struggling automotive economy, will eliminate one-third of its workforce during the next two months.

    And if the situation there doesn't improve, local union leaders say they believe the plant might be shut down entirely.

    Local 2383 President Dwayne Gilbert said that 37 union workers would be let go on Wednesday and 47 more on Nov. 10, leaving 147 employees at the company that in 2000 had about 1,100 in 2000.