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Local News

  • All signs point to elections

    Just as falling leaves sprinkle about Shelbyville to signify the arrival of autumn, political campaign signs are beginning to pepper the city, indicating that Election Day is approaching.

    Seven candidates are vying for six spots on the Shelbyville City Council. And with Nov. 4 drawing near, the hopefuls are actively spreading their names and listening to the concerns of the people of Shelbyville.

    Council members are elected on a non-partisan basis every two years, and the Mayor is elected to a 4-year term.

  • Auto Pointe to shut down

    One of Shelbyville's biggest car dealerships is driving off the lot and out of business: Auto Pointe of Shelbyville will close its doors Oct. 31.

    Owner Matt Fetter said a plummeting economy has made buying and selling automobiles difficult.

    "It's the economy," he said. "We are suffering from it just like everyone else."

    Auto Pointe, which sells pre-owned vehicles of all makes and models at 200 Boone Station Road, has been in the community since January 2005.

  • Drug advisory council saved by grant

    A local agency dedicated to preventing drug abuse has received a grant that will allow it to continue to operate.

    Terry Graney, treasurer and board member of the Shelby County Drug/Alcohol Advisory Council, Inc., said the council has received a $125,000 Drug Free Communities federal grant, renewable for five years, bringing the total grant amount to $625,000.

    This funding will allow the non-profit organization to hire some staff members, including a director-without which continued operation would be impossible, Graney said.

  • Hospital named in law suit

    Jewish Hospital Shelbyville has now been added to the list of parties being sued by a Waddy man who says his penis was amputated by mistake last fall.

    Phillip Seaton, 61, and his wife, Deborah, filed suit Oct. 7 in Shelby County Circuit Court against the hospital where the surgery was performed last October.

    Seaton has previously filed suit against the doctor who performed the surgery, Dr. John Patterson, the anesthesiologist, Dr. Oliver James, as well as Commonwealth Urology, PSC, in Frankfort, which employs Patterson.

  • Officials reviving human rights commission

    Officials from the county's three governments plan to resuscitate a local human rights commission that has been inactive for more than a decade.

    Shelby County Judge-Executive Rob Rothenburger, Shelbyville Mayor Tom Hardesty and Simpsonville Mayor Steve Eden said they will appoint members to a human rights commission board that will serve as a local adjunct of the Kentucky Human Rights Commission. The state rights commission is charged with enforcing the state's Civil Rights Act, which forbids discrimination in employment, housing and public accommodations.

  • County gets FEMA grant for windstorm damage

    Shelby County will be one of 33 counties in Kentucky to receive federal aid to clean up after last month's windstorm.

    Local Disaster and Emergency Services officials said the county will receive $154,000 from the U.S. Department of Homeland Security's Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) because of the downed trees, roof damage and other destruction caused when the remnants of Hurricane Ike brought 70-mile-per-hour winds to the county on Sept. 14.

  • Deed transfers

    Gary Coffey and Carlotta J. Coffee to Stephen R. Coleman, parcels of Stone Farm divided, $265,000.

    Donald Hamilton, Inc., to Robert and Carolyn Wolfe, tract 6, Reynolds Farm division, $231,801.74.

    Nader Ehsani and Fourouzan Majdian to Aaron and Sopit Kinakin, lot 172, Persimmon Ridge, phase VIII, $387,000.

    Commonwealth Bank and Trust to Mane Photo, LLC , property in Colt Run Subdivision, 125,000.

    Daniel Jr. and Brittney Flanagan to Jennifer R. Delozier, lot 178, Midland Estates, section VII, $116,000.

  • Simpsonville moves forward on downtown 'vision'

    The Simpsonville City Commission Tuesday voted to advertise and accept bids from consulting firms that would draw up plans for a downtown district.

    Earlier this year, the commission asked Triple S Planning and Zoning Executive Director Ryan Libke to help the city take a look at the U.S. 60 corridor through Simpsonville by using a small-area study. Such a study would find ways to create a true downtown Simpsonville along U. S. 60.

  • Troopers cracking down on road rage against truckers

    Drivers need to be more considerate when sharing the road with truckers or face the increasing possibility that they could be ticketed by the Kentucky State Police.

    KSP Commissioner Rodney Brewer announced this week the launch of a "TACT" campaign (Ticketing Aggressive Cars and Trucks) to address hostile driving behaviors between commercial motor vehicles and motorists.

  • Neighbor denies provoking minister to pull gun

    A Bagdad man who was the alleged target of his neighbor's wrath said he did not provoke the incident in any way.

    R.Z. Miller, also of Bagdad, is charged with second-degree wanton endangerment for pulling a gun on his neighbor, Dana Duncan.

    GRAPH ON HIS SITUAITON

    Miller pleaded not guilty Tuesday in Shelby District Court on a charge of second-degree wanton endangerment. He will appear for a pre-trial hearing.

    Miller said in an interview last week that he only raised his gun in an incident July 24 because Duncan had threatened him with a Weed Eater.