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Local News

  • Rain delays Girls' State Golf Tournament

    The Shelby County girls' golf team's pursuit of a state championship was put on hold Tuesday when play was halted due to a thunderstorm passing through the Bowling Green area.

    The teams were pulled off the course at 12:15 p.m. CDST, because of lightning, and the delay lasted three hours and 15 minutes.

    Michaela Manley was the only Lady Rocket on the course when the delay started; she had hit one shot on her opening round.

  • Judge reverses court gun ban

    Every once in a while, a judge will reconsider his opinion.

    That's what Family Court Judge John David Myles did on Tuesday, when he reversed his decision on limiting which on-duty officers could carry firearms into his courtroom.

    Previously, only Sheriff's deputies could carry weapons in his court.

    Myles said he did this for the safety of everyone in the courtroom.

    Local law enforcement disagreed.

  • Shelby Energy fined in death

    The Shelby Energy Cooperative has been ordered to pay $15,000 in fines for safety violations - several of which are said to have contributed to the death of an electrical worker last year.

    On Monday, the Kentucky Public Service Commission (PSC) announced that it has accepted a settlement with Shelby Energy over six safety violations.

    The violations, which range from failure of personnel to wear proper safety gear to inadequate vertical clearance of electrical wires, carry a maximum fine of $2,500 each.

  • Five more homes sold at foreclosure auction

    The scene in the lobby at the Shelby County Courthouse was the same as usual for Todd Davis on Thursday.

    Davis, who is the master commissioner for the Shelby Circuit Court, presided over the sale of five homes at auction.

    The reason for the auction?

    Foreclosure.

    A dreaded word among homeowners, it's all-too familiar to too many families.

    Since the foreclosure auctions began in Shelby County in 1996, Davis said 2008 has seen a record number of residential foreclosures, with 150 already this year, compared to 120 last year.

  • First Baptist calls pastor

    First Baptist Church of Shelbyville has called a new senior pastor to lead the more than 700 people in its congregation.

    Dr. Steve Rice of Floyd County was announced as the new pastor last Sunday after being affirmed by 99.3 percent of the voting church members.

    Rice said he and his family are thankful for the unity in the church's calling him to be their pastor.

    He said having such a high percentage of the congregation vote in favor of a prospective pastor "is some what uncommon in a church that size."

  • Monday is deadline to register to vote

    Those who haven't yet registered to vote for this fall's Presidential election have just a few more days to do so.

    "You have to register in the county where you live by the end of the day on Monday," Shelby County Clerk Sue Carol Perry said.

    Voters on Nov. 4 not only will choose a new President from among John McCain, Barrack Obama and others, but they also will elect a U.S. Senator, a new member of Congress and a state representative. The school board and city councils in Shelbyville and Simpsonville also will be contested.

  • King pleads in 1998 murder

    A Mount Eden woman facing murder for a 1998 incident involving her on-again, off-again boyfriend pleaded guilty to manslaughter last Thursday in Spencer County Circuit Court.

    Susan Jean King, 48, told Circuit Judge Charles Hickman she wanted to enter the amended plea of second-degree manslaughter pursuant to North Carolina v. Alford, meaning King does not admit guilt, but she believes it is in her best interest to plead guilty because of the evidence against her.

    King was indicted by the grand jury in April 2007 in the murder of Kyle "Deannie" Breeden.

  • Board shoots down Hubble

    The road to the school district's new educational campus still doesn't have a name.

    But that's not because the committee assigned to task didn't try.

    Last Thursday night the Shelby County School Board rejected a community-based committee's recommendation to name the road "Hubble Boulevard," in honor of Edwin Powell Hubble.

    Hubble was a Rhode's scholar who lived in Shelby County for a summer and went on to make monumental discoveries in the astronomy and physics. NASA later named a telescope after him.

  • School board approves $41 million budget

    The Shelby County School system will spend more than $41 million this year on educating the 6,394 students in the district.

    That means that the budget, which was passed last Thursday night, allocates a little more than $6,500 for the education of each local student.

    This is the biggest budget the board has ever passed.

    For the past two years the board has passed budgets that were expected to take out of the district's saving in order to cover expenses.

    However, each year the actual revenues have exceeded actual expenditures.

  • Economic plunge brings concern

    After the $700 billion financial rescue plan was rejected by the House of Representatives on Monday, the Dow fell nearly 778 points, its worst one-day loss in history.

    Depending on age, occupation and location, people are affected by the struggling economy in different ways.

    However, there was a common sensitivity among many people in downtown Shelbyville on Tuesday morning: concern.

    Like many who worry about bills both today and in the future, Tammy Rannells couldn't narrow down her list of concerns.