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Local News

  • Charity sponsoring new home for Medley

    As a kid, Ben Medley used to play on his grandparents' .Bruce and Ann Langley's, farm near Bagdad. Within a few months, he'll be back there again.

    But this time, Ben, his wife, Emma, and his stepson, Tucker, will be living in his own house, a house completely accessible to the 27-year-old who has been in a wheelchair for nearly three years. Medley broke two vertebrae in his neck when he dove into a swimming pool in July 2005.

  • 2008 Shelby County Fair Queen candidates

    The contestants must have reached her 16th birthday by Oct. 31 and shall not have reached her 22nd birthday by Oct. 31 of the year when the contest is held. Contestants will be judged from the standpoint of beauty, poise and personality.

    At 2:30 p.m. Tuesday, they will compete in shorts attire, followed by formal attire at 7:30 p.m. There is also a private showing in bathing attire for judges only.

    Five finalists will be selected from the contestants, and a first runner-up and winner will then be selected.

  • Crusade totals comparable to last year's $160K

    Though this year's WHAS Crusade for Children collection total fell short of last year's total by $24,714, that figure is misleading.

    The figures for this year and last year would actually be pretty close if not for a bequest to the Crusade in a will last year.

    This year's total was $162,077.18, compared to last year's of $186,791.43. But without last year's donation of $25,000 from Lola Register the total from 2007 would have been $161,791.43. That means firefighters collected about $300 more on the streets this year than they did last year.

  • Board to talk contracts

    Although James Neihof has been in the role of superintendent of Shelby County Public Schools for a week and a half, he still doesn't have a contract to show for it.

    But that's something that the Shelby County Board of Education is set put in order at a meeting this Thursday night.

    Neihof, who was named the new superintendent in April, took office June 2 as the "superintendent designee." That means that he has all of the responsibilities of a superintendent but is not yet under contract.

  • Former Judge-Executive Bobby Stratton dies

    Long-time Shelby County Judge-Executive Bobby Stratton died Saturday at Baptist Hospital Northeast Hospice Unit in LaGrange. Stratton was 86.

    A businessman and owner of Stratton Sporting Goods for 25 years, he was the county's judge-executive from 1981-2002. As judge-executive, Stratton presided over the building of the current jail, the buying of the courthouse annex and the building of the Multi-Purpose Community Action Agency and the Stratton Center, which was named for him. He extended water lines in the county and saw most of the county's roads get paved.

  • Fair share of fun

    This year's county fair promises to be not only as full of fun as usual, but also better-organized, said fair board president Randy Tennill.

    "This year the fair will last a few more days, which will give us a few more days to work with," he said.

  • Missing woman's family offers reward

    The family of Maxine Ethington, who has been missing for two and a half weeks, is now offering a $10,000 reward for information leading to her immediate recovery.

    Shelby County sheriff's deputy Jim Insco, who spoke at a press conference called by the Ethington family on Friday, said that time has become a very important factor for the missing 87-year-old woman with dementia.

  • Dystonia event Saturday

    Having a rare disease is scary. Having doctors not know how to treat you can be terrifying.

    Just ask Jennifer Heil. Before she was being properly diagnosed with Dystonia, Heil went to see four doctors and lived through months of pain.

    Dystonia, which is a neurological disorder that is characterized by repetitive muscle contractions, can cause the twisting and jerking movement of the body.

    Heil said the disease causes all of the muscles in her face, neck, back and stomach to constrict.

  • Goal: Removing the barriers to education

    In his first official act as superintendent, James Neihof got to hand out diplomas to over 300 seniors at the graduation ceremony last Friday night.

    Neihof, who took office on Monday, said seeing all of the Shelby County High School students receive a certificate for 12 years of successful education reminded him of why he wanted to be superintendent of Shelby County Public Schools.

    "This is why we do what we do," he said. "To see those kids succeed in school and be prepared to excel in whatever they go on to next."

  • Yard sale to help family

    A community yard sale will be held this weekend to help cover the medical costs of a local woman who was hurt in a car accident five years.

    In 2003, Carmela Cox was in an automobile accident that caused a massive stroke. The trauma caused her to lose the use of her left arm and much of her ability to walk.

    The money raised from the yard sale will be used to offset medical expenses.