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Local News

  • Teacher choking student case under review

    County Attorney Hart Megibben is reviewing a case in which a local teacher is accused of choking a student during class.

    Local law enforcement and Child Protective Services are still investigating the case, which involves former West Middle School art teacher Catherine Lindsey and a female student. Lindsey has since resigned.

    Megibben said he is waiting until he has more information on the case before he makes a decision on how to proceed.

    The incident in question happened on May 5, 2008.

  • Simpsonville approves zoning regs

    The Simpsonville City Commission voted unanimously on Wednesday to adopt new zoning regulations for the 1-64 interchange.

    The new regulations, which affect the permitted uses for property adjacent to or near Exit 28, were created in order to specify what is, and what is not, allowed in that area.

    Included in the proposed regulations is a list of over 300 types of businesses that are permitted or excluded.

    Each of these types of businesses is labeled as permitted, conditionally permitted or not allowed.

  • Triple S approves Cropper telecom tower

    Cellular service may soon be improving in Cropper.

    At its Aug. 19 meeting, The Triple S Planning and Zoning Commission approved an application from Powertel/Memphis, Inc. d/b/a T-Mobile USA, Inc. for a 300-foot self-support telecommunication tower on Robert and Judy Allen's farm at 6582 Cropper Rd.

    The tower's purpose is to transport data from Louisville to Eastern Kentucky. It will be capable of holding four cellular carriers, with T-Mobile being one of them, to provide better cellular service in the Cropper area.

  • Drugs, money seized in bust

    When deputies pulled over a car for running a stop sign on Woodfield Circle last Friday, they had no idea the traffic stop would lead to a drug bust.

    Shelby County Sheriff's Detective Jason Rice said the incident began routinely enough, but that he and sheriff's deputy Eric Hettinger got suspicious when the passenger got out of the car and started walking away.

    "We called to him to come back and he did, and he was acting really nervous," Rice said. "That's when we started to suspect we had something more than just somebody running a stop sign."

  • Library dedication: Hudson Room opens

    Close to 70 people came to the dedication of the new addition to the Shelby County Public Library on Aug. 16.

    Most of the addition, which has added 5,500 additional square feet to the library space, was opened to the public in late June.

    But the library's new program room, the Hudson room, was not opened to the public until the dedication.

    The room, which named after the current president of the library's board, Kenneth Hudson, is capable of seating up to 200 people. It will be used for public functions and group meetings.

  • Golden Alert issued for Ethington

    A local woman missing for almost three months is the focus of a new alert just passed into law.

    A "Golden Alert" was issued Tuesday for Maxine Ethington, missing since May from her Shelbyville home.

    The alert legislation was enacted by the General Assembly last spring and very recently became law.

  • Five arrested at SCHS

    Five Shelby County High School students were taken into custody Wednesday morning following an altercation between two students that resulted in an assault on a Shelby County sheriff's deputy.

    Deputies arrested four juveniles - three female, one male - and one adult male.

    The altercation was sparked by a verbal spat between two female students during breakfast in the school's cafeteria.

    Shelby County Sheriff Mike Armstrong said a crowd formed around the girls as they shouted profanities at each other.

  • Lawsuit brought against Triple S

    "As a member of the community, I just think compliance to the rules is essential to the well-being of the community."

    That's why Kathryn W. Sjothun said she, along with William L. Selvidge, M.D filed a lawsuit against the Triple S Planning Commission's approval of the minor subdivision application of Charles and Helen Crabtree Stables, Inc. last month.

  • Sugg takes state post

    When James Neihof was named the new superintendent this past June, school board member Allen Phillips gave him one little piece of advice concerning the district's personnel.

    "You pray as hard as you can that Sally Sugg sticks around," he said.

    But, despite the board's hopes and Neihof's prayers, Sugg has taken an administrative position with the Kentucky Department of Education.

    Sugg's resignation was announced at last Thursday night's board meeting.

  • United Way names new team for fall campaign

    The Metro United Way's local campaign will get a new face this year -- literally and figuratively.

    A couple of new faces will be running this year's campaign, which formally kicks off Sept. 12.

    Brian Webb, vice president in commercial lending with Citizens Union Bank, will be the local leader of the effort. Webb has previously worked as chair of the United Way's CEO calling team. Webb replaces Commonwealth Bank and Trust Company's Shelby Market President Belinda Nichols. However, Nichols is staying actively involved in this year's campaign.