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Local News

  • Pentagon survivor speaks about Sept. 11

    The microphone he was using wasn't necessary as Sgt. Maj. Tony Rose took a deep breath and began to talk about the horrific events of Sept. 11, 2001.

    Total silence blanketed the banquet room at Claudia Sanders Thursday as Rose spoke to the Shelbyville Board of Realtors at their annual meeting Thursday.

    "Where were you that day?" he asked. "Close your eyes. Can you see it?"

    Rose, an Elizabethtown resident, was at his desk at the Pentagon when American Airlines flight 77 slammed into the building and exploded directly under his second floor office.

  • Shelby to celebrate Labor Day

    As summer nears its end, the first Monday of September marks Labor Day - a day when we celebrate the achievements of American workers.

    Leading the celebration in Shelbyville is Shelbyville-Shelby County branch of NAACP with its annual pageant and parade.

  • A new-fangled way to cut tobacco

    Ray Tucker was cutting tobacco on his farm Tuesday morning. But rather than stooping, swinging, lifting and spearing, he was driving a machine that was doing the backbreaking work for him.

    Tucker is experimenting with a mechanical tobacco harvester manufactured by the Kirpy Company of France that cuts the plant, notches it and lays it on a wagon gentle as a baby. Rather than a field full of workers swinging tomahawks and spearing plants on sticks, cutting with the Kirpy requires one to drive the tractor and another worker to pull a wagon alongside.

  • City real estate taxes stay even; Personal tax rates drop

    At its August 21 meeting, the Shelbyville City Council approved the first reading of an ordinance levying ad valorem property tax rates for the calendar year of 2008.

    The tax rate proposed this year is 27.5 cents per $100.00 assessed real property. The rate is the same as last year, and is expected to produce about $1.9 million in revenue. Last year it produced just over $1.8 million.

    The tax rate on personal property within the city will be reduced from 46.8 cents on each $100.00 of assessed value last year, to 43.1 cents this year.

  • School board to consider tax increase

    Shelby County property owners could see an increase in taxes next year.

    The Shelby County Board of Education will hold a public hearing on the proposed tax increases this Thursday night in order to receive public comment on the .5 percent increase on real property and .2 percent increase on personal property.

    Superintendent James Neihof said the increases are in line with past tax increases, state law, and are consistent with the "cost of living" increases that the district has experienced.

  • Local Democrat attends DNC

    One of the youngest delegates at this week's Democratic National Convention got hooked on politics while sitting in a government class at Shelby County High School.

    Arshiya Saiyed, who graduated from SCHS in 2006, said her path to representing Kentucky at the DNC began when her teacher, Phillip Bell, made politics come alive in class.

    "Through his classes and having lively debates with classmates, I learned the importance of political involvement," she said.

  • Items needed for Backpack Project

    The sight of canned goods stacked in piles has become increasingly common at local medical offices in recent weeks.

    Local heath care providers are collecting food for needy children in the community.

    Diana Shoemaker, who has organized the food drive, said all of the food will be donated to help support the Shelby County Backpack Project. She said local medical offices, hospitals, and doctors have rallied around Backpack Projects' concern for providing food for needy children in the area.

  • Trash class: Studying society through trash

    Local teachers Joe Franzen and Thom Coffee recently gave their students a first hand experience on a archeological dig where they learned about a strange and unknown culture.

    But they didn't have to get on a plane to Egypt or Israel. In fact, they didn't even leave their classroom - they just had to root through the trash from the teacher's lounge.

    Franzen and Coffee, both history teachers at West Middle School, recently gave their students a lesson in garbagology - the study of trash.

  • A pig in a bullpen: Family adopts orphan potbellied pig

    They named him Wilbur although the Sherrod family isn't sure if the potbellied pig someone dropped off near their home is a boy or girl.

    Whatever the sex, Wilbur likes apples and he really likes bread. And he isn't afraid of bulls.

    Wilbur was one of two potbellied pigs the Sherrod family found wandering their property a little over a week ago. Apparently they were castoffs from someone who didn't like the pigs' rooting - Wilbur wears a nose ring.

  • Waits named president of jailers association

    Shelby County Jailer Bobby Waits has been elected president of the Kentucky Jailers Association (KJA) for the third time.

    That's quite an honor considering there are 74 jailers in Kentucky, said Marshall Long, executive director of the KJA.

    "He's one of the better jailers in the state," Long said. "He does an excellent job and he runs a good, tight ship. He works hard and he's well-respected by other jailers."

    Waits acknowledged that while heading up the association is indeed an honor, the position involves a lot of traveling back and forth to Frankfort.