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Local News

  • Dead-animal issue laid to rest

    No one at Shelby County Fiscal Court's meeting Tuesday seemed unhappy that the county will not be getting into the dead animal hauling business.

    Magistrates unanimously approved a contract with Dars, Inc. a company from Winchester, Ky., that has agreed to haul off the county's roughly 2,000 dead livestock per year to be rendered into fertilizer by a company in Greensburg, Ind.

  • Shelby's crime rate declines

    The jail is full, sirens can be heard screaming day and night, sensational crimes have made headlines, and, yet, law enforcement officials report crime is down.

    Despite two murders in 2008 - and another this year - statistics compiled by the Shelby County Sheriff's office and Shelbyville Police Department show crime has diminished significantly since 2007.

    Actually, the fact that the jails are full is a good thing because it contributes to the decreased crime rate, Shelby County Sheriff Mike Armstrong said.

  • EARLIER: Casey continues his tough fight

      Shelby Countian Mike Casey continues his touch-and-go battle to stay alive at Vanderbilt Medical Center.

    Casey, who starred on the basketball court for both Shelby County High School and the University of Kentucky, continues on a respirator as doctors try to rid his body of infection and prepare him for the  heart transplant he requires to survive.

  • Casey's health somewhat "stable'

    Mike Casey, one of Shelby County’s sports heroes, continues his agonizing fight to recover from a series of ailments related to a failing heart.

    Casey has been in intensive care at Vanderbilt Medical Center in Nashville for two weeks since doctors installed a bilateral pump to assist his heart, which was damaged by infection 20 years ago.

    His battle has been touch-and-go, with infection raging in his body, blockages and shutdowns of organs and  the breathing assistance of a ventilator.

  • Simpsonville property owners now responsible for sidewalks

    The Simpsonville City Commission on Tuesday passed on second reading an ordinance that will require property owners to repair broken sidewalks or assume the liability those cracks and crevices could cause. There never had been an ordinance to address this issue, and the city feared that it could be liable for any injuries caused by breaches in those areas.   What it means

    If you own property that has sidewalks around it that have breaks, cracks or drop-offs that could cause an accident, the city could require you to have it repaired.

  • Court's resolution backs Ardmore-area sewer project

    Shelby County Fiscal Court on Tuesday night passed a resolution backing the Shelbyville Municipal Water and Sewer Commission's plan to bring sewers to 75 lots in the Ardmore/Arlington Lane areas.

    The project is part of the commission's sewer expansion, which will serve the new schools being built in  the area as well as new residential and commercial development. The total cost of the project is $1.6 million.

  • Horse farms lead agricultural boom

    About five years ago, Karen and the late Ed Frickey decided to move their 40-head Saddlebred and hackney pony operation from Lafayette, Ind., to Harrington Mill Road in Shelby County.

    “All of our friends in the industry were here, and all of the shows we wanted to go to are here,” Karen Frickey said. “And we've always loved Kentucky.”

  • Cycling series to roll through Waddy

    If you’ve ever watched Lance Armstrong ride past the throngs of fans in the Tour de France, here’s your chance to get a taste of it.

    It’s not exactly the French countryside, but the McDonald’s Kentuckiana Spring Classic Series will roll through Waddy on Sunday. Cyclists will speed through a 10-mile loop that will test everyone from beginning amateurs to junior and professionals.

  • Casey endures further problems

    Mike Casey’s struggle with health problems continues to be an hour-to-hour battle for survival.

    Casey’s body is being assaulted by an infection that is leaving him dehydrated,  damaging other organs and sapping him bit by bit of his strength.

    He lies in the intensive-care unit of the Vanderbilt Medical Center, where doctors are trying to strengthen him for a life-extending heart transplant to replace that was damaged by an infection 20 years ago.

  • State will celebrate Arbor Day here

    On Tuesday morning at the Tim McClure Botanical Gardens, Vicki Sutherland and Barbara Troyer were spreading Snapshot - little round, yellow pellets laced with herbicide designed to keep down the weeds.

    While most in the county are huddled around the TV sets watching their favorite teams advance - or go home - Shelby County's Master Gardeners have been sprucing up the gardens, which will be the site of this year's state celebration of Arbor Day on April 3.