.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Local News

  • County expands options for disposal of storm debris

    By Lisa King/Sentinel-News staff writer

    Shelby County residents who have been looking for a more convenient way to dispose of debris from the ice and wind storms now have a new option: the County Road Department.

  • Bank responds to accusation of negligence

    Commonwealth Bank has denied any wrongdoing in a suit that alleges the bank was guilty of negligence and fraudulent actions,.

    Attorney Mark D. Dean of Shelbyville sued the bank, charging it should have noticed that his secretary was embezzling millions of dollars from him.

    In a lawsuit filed in January in Shelby County Circuit Court, Dean accused the bank of violating a Kentucky Uniform Commercial Code as well as aiding and abetting fraud and illegal activity and breach of duty of ordinary care.

  • EARLIER: Local lawyer sues bank

    An attorney from Shelbyville has filed suit against a bank for not noticing that his secretary was embezzling millions of dollars from him.

    Mark D. Dean accuses Commonwealth Bank of violation of a Kentucky Uniform Commercial Code, as well as aiding and abetting fraud and illegal activity and breach of duty of ordinary care.

  • Sunday alcohol vote set for Tuesday night

    The matter of Sunday alcohol sales in Shelby County is on the table for the first time this year.

    The issue, set for review at Tuesday’s meeting of the Shelby County Fiscal Court, was brought before magistrates four times in 2008, the last time in September. That was the only time that the matter made it to a second reading, but it died because of  a 4-4 tie.

    Tuesday night, for the first time, the vote could turn out differently.

  • County officials hear from FEMA

    County officials hear from FEMA Process for reimbursement from ice storm will take time   By Lisa King/Sentinel-News staff writer  

    Shelby County officials are a step closer to being reimbursed for damages from the Ice Storm of 2009 after a visit from FEMA representatives on Tuesday.

  • Meeting for Tuesday to determine FEMA aid

    Shelby County Emergency Management Agency representatives, along with the Shelby County Chamber of Commerce, will meet with FEMA officials Tuesday to determine the extent of federal aid from FEMA for ice storm recovery, Emergency Management Director Charlie Frazee said.

  • EARLIER: Nation Bros. to stop dead animal pickup today

    Starting today, farmers may want to work doubly hard to keep their cattle, horses and other livestock healthy; there's no good place to send them if they die.

    Nation Bros., which has a contract with the county to pick up and render dead livestock, has notified Shelby County Judge Executive Rob Rothenburger that its last day of business will be today.

  • EARLIER: FDA rule may halt dead-animal disposal here

     The buzzards and coyotes may be cheering, but county officials and livestock producers are concerned about a new FDA regulation that may put the region's only dead livestock disposal service out of business.

    Nation Brothers Inc.'s Gabe Nation said he may be forced out of business if a new FDA regulation requiring the removal of brain and spinal cord tissues from any bovine over 30 months of age goes into effect.

  • Free eye screenings for kids set for March

    Staff Photos by Lisa King

    Barbara Edwards with the Lions Club does an eye scan of Odin Schak (held by Shauna Schak) and Nova Schak, 4.

     

    Maria Stivers examines an image of a child's eyes that was taken by the Lion's Club last week.

        Here’s how to get your child’s eyes checked for free  

    Lions Club sponsors program to check children 1-5 for common maladies that need early treatment.

  • Jewish Hospital reveals new ER, gets new grant

    A ribbon has been cut on a new present for the community.

    After five years of development, Jewish Hospital Shelbyville unveiled its freshly renovated and expanded emergency room.

    Michael Collins, president and CEO of the hospital, reflected on the project before a room full of supporters in the hospital's community room Wednesday afternoon.

    Collins said he and other officials began brainstorming in 2004 as the emergency department was having between 17,000 and 18,000 visits per year in a space designed for a capacity of 15,000.