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Local News

  • Boards may get more members

    Two boards of appointed Shelbyville leaders may soon need to pull up a few extra seats.

    Separate ordinances were brought before the Shelbyville City Council on Thursday, one calling to increase the number of code enforcement board members from three to five, and the other to bump the Historic District Commission from five to seven members.

    Shelbyville Mayor Tom Hardesty said the same reasoning justifies increasing the size of both groups.

  • Tapp: Adoption bill's chances 'slim'

     Senate Bill 68, a measure that would prohibit unmarried couples from becoming adoptive or foster parents, is running out of time to make it through this session of the legislature, said the bill's sponsor, state Sen. Gary Tapp.

    “The chances of it going anywhere in the House are slim,” Tapp said. “It's just a little late in the session.”

    Tapp said the bill would have strong support in both houses of the legislature if it could make it to the floor for a vote in both chambers.

  • County says yes to Sunday liquor sales

    The ongoing battle about Sunday alcohol sales in the county finally has come to an end.

    With a full house in attendance, the Shelby County Fiscal Court voted Tuesday night in favor of an ordinance allowing liquor to be sold in county restaurants on Sunday.

  • Simpsonville residents offer ideas for city's future

    Simpsonville residents went to an old place Thursday night to discuss ideas for something entirely new.

    More than two dozen of them gathered around tables on the floor of the old Simpsonville Gym to brainstorm ideas on how the city might plan to develop a new downtown district along the U.S. 60 corridor.

    Simpsonville’s Town Council voted last fall to hire a consulting firm – HTNB of Louisville --- to pursue this concept, and Thursday’s session was the public’s first involvement, other than comments in town council meetings.

  • Black history presentation set for Thursday at library

    In recognition of Black History Month, a program will be held at the Shelby County Public Library this Thursday night spotlighting the Black 43rd Aviation Squadron at Bowman Field during World War II.

    The program will take place from 6-7:30 p.m. in the Hudson Room.

    The program will be presented by Dr. Bruce Tyler, professor of history at the University of Louisville.

    Photos of the squadron are already on display at the library on the main floor at the circulation desk.

  • EARLIER: Bell has been treated for AIDs

     A Shelbyville minister jailed on charges of  sodomizing and sexually abusing a juvenile has AIDS, family sources said.

    James H. Bell, 47, pastor of Refuge Temple Church of God in Christ, was arrested and charged with third-degree sodomy, second-degree sexual abuse and first-degree wanton endangerment after confessing to police that he had unprotected deviant sex with a 15-year-old while knowing that he was infected with the HIV virus.

  • Fiscal court revises ordinances, makes new appointment

    Shelby County Fiscal Court attended to a variety of housekeeping items at its meeting on Tuesday night, including revisions to several ordinances.

    Magistrates approved a first reading of an ordinance declaring a moratorium on zoning map amendments in part of unincorporated Shelby County.

    They also voted in favor of a first reading for an ordinance repealing an existing ordinance concerning solid waste, favoring a revised document.

  • Be careful about what, where, when you burn

    With all the loose wood and other debris lying around, the Shelby County Fire and Emergency Services Association urges the community to know and follow the open burn laws.

    No opening burning is allowed within the city limits of Shelbyville, but the remainder of the county has no such restrictions. The state does have restrictions that would apply to various situations.

    Paul Whitman, assistant director of Shelby County Emergency Management Agency, said the best thing people can do is to be informed before burning anything.

  • EARLIER: Ice, limbs, and potholes, oh my!

    From ice to fallen limbs to potholes - a wild winter's impact keeps commuting citizens stressed and those responsible for tending to them plenty busy.

    Through the winter months salt is put down on roads to melt ice and keep the roads clear for travel. But as the ice turns to liquid, it flows into cracks, eventually refreezing and putting significant stress on the pavement. As the ice thaws again, the leftover water washes away loose pieces of the road, leaving behind enlarged splits and potholes.

  • Men arraigned on charges of molestation

    Two men charged in two different cases of sexual abuse involving a minor child have been arraigned.

    Anthony Watkins, 37, of Waddy was arraigned Wednesday in Shelby Circuit Court, and James  Bell, 47, of Shelbyville was arraigned last week.