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Local News

  • State will celebrate Arbor Day here

    On Tuesday morning at the Tim McClure Botanical Gardens, Vicki Sutherland and Barbara Troyer were spreading Snapshot - little round, yellow pellets laced with herbicide designed to keep down the weeds.

    While most in the county are huddled around the TV sets watching their favorite teams advance - or go home - Shelby County's Master Gardeners have been sprucing up the gardens, which will be the site of this year's state celebration of Arbor Day on April 3.

  • Arbor Day celebration honors McClure

    A cold, biting wind and gray, overcast skies couldn't dampen the warmth that permeated the crowd of about 100 who turned out for Arbor Day to honor one of Shelby's own.

    In addition to the 113th official State Arbor Day Celebration being held in Shelby County at Clear Creek Park, that event was also chosen to dedicate the arboretum at that site.

    The arboretum is now known as the Tim McClure Botanical Gardens, after a division of Forestry employee who died unexpectedly last May.

  • Chamber's Community Showcase is Saturday

    Given the tough economic times, this year's “Survivor” theme for the Shelby County Chamber of Commerce's Community Showcase may be especially apt.

    “We're calling this one 'Surviving Tough Times,'” said Shelley Goodwin, executive director of the chamber.

  • SCHS graduation decision reversed

    Another decision by Shelby County High School’s site-based decision making council has caused some strong reactions among parents and students at Shelby County High School -- even though the decision has been reversed. The council voted in February to abolish seating by grade-point average at the school’s commencement.

  • EARLIER: Casey placed on respirator

    Family members remained hopeful Thursday that Mike Casey could pull through the overtime game he is playing against heart disease.

    Casey, the former Shelby County and University of Kentucky basketball star, gave everyone a scare early Thursday when he stopped breathing. Doctors at Vanderbilt University Medical Center placed him on a ventilator.

    On Thursday afternoon he was resting peacefully, having been sedated because of the discomfort caused by the breathing tube in his throat.

  • Stumbo's suit against school board dismissed

    Shelby County Circuit Judge Charles Hickman has dismissed a suit brought against the school board by a fired former teacher who was trying to regain access to school grounds so he could attend his daughter's activities.

    Scott Stumbo, a former Shelby County High School teacher, was banned from school grounds in February 2007 after being fired for allegedly sexually harassing a student in 2006.

    Stumbo was indicted on charges of distribution of obscene material to a minor. He submitted an Alford Plea and was sentenced to 180 days in jail, probated for 24 months.

  • EARLIER: Delegation lobbies Congress on dead animal removal

    Kentucky's county leaders took the issue of dead animal disposal to the halls of Congress last week in an effort to get at least a delay in an FDA regulation that, at least temporarily, has shut down local farmers' ability to remove large animals that die on their farms.

    Representatives from the Kentucky Association of Counties (KACo) met with Sen. Mitch McConnell and Congressmen Brett Guthrie, Hal Rogers, Ed Whitfield and a staff member from Congressman Ben Chandler's office. The KACo delegation included Shelby County Magistrate Tony Carriss.

  • EARLIER: New concept presented for new school

    The Shelby County School Board is considering a brand new concept for how it might use the new secondary school it is building west of Shelbyville.

    At a board meeting Thursday, Superintendent James Neihof outlined tentative plans and called for public hearings on a concept that would have two 5-year high schools in the county: one at Shelby County High School and the other on this new property.

  • County officials hope stimulus dollars will help projects

    Leaders in Shelby County are hopeful that the $3.2 billion allotted to the state by President Obama’s stimulus package will provide dollars for several planned local projects.

    Obama’s American Recovery and Reinvestment Act is spreading dollars to states to help develop economic recovery and preserve health care, education and other opportunities to create jobs.

    Gov. Steve Beshear on Wednesday announced his “Kentucky At Work” initiative to use those dollars during the next 28 months to help preserve jobs and grow the economy.

  • EARLIER: New school to be named after Martha Layne Collins

    Shelby County's new secondary school will be named for after former Kentucky Gov. Martha Layne Collins.

    The school board on Thursday night approved this honor for Collins, the only woman to be governor. She is a Bagdad native who graduated from Shelbyville and a former teacher.

    Collins became governor in 1983, serving one term, before getting involved in education reform and economic development by serving in various education-based roles. Since 1998, she has been executive scholar-in-residence at Georgetown College.