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Local News

  • Monday is deadline to register to vote

    Those who haven't yet registered to vote for this fall's Presidential election have just a few more days to do so.

    "You have to register in the county where you live by the end of the day on Monday," Shelby County Clerk Sue Carol Perry said.

    Voters on Nov. 4 not only will choose a new President from among John McCain, Barrack Obama and others, but they also will elect a U.S. Senator, a new member of Congress and a state representative. The school board and city councils in Shelbyville and Simpsonville also will be contested.

  • King pleads in 1998 murder

    A Mount Eden woman facing murder for a 1998 incident involving her on-again, off-again boyfriend pleaded guilty to manslaughter last Thursday in Spencer County Circuit Court.

    Susan Jean King, 48, told Circuit Judge Charles Hickman she wanted to enter the amended plea of second-degree manslaughter pursuant to North Carolina v. Alford, meaning King does not admit guilt, but she believes it is in her best interest to plead guilty because of the evidence against her.

    King was indicted by the grand jury in April 2007 in the murder of Kyle "Deannie" Breeden.

  • Board shoots down Hubble

    The road to the school district's new educational campus still doesn't have a name.

    But that's not because the committee assigned to task didn't try.

    Last Thursday night the Shelby County School Board rejected a community-based committee's recommendation to name the road "Hubble Boulevard," in honor of Edwin Powell Hubble.

    Hubble was a Rhode's scholar who lived in Shelby County for a summer and went on to make monumental discoveries in the astronomy and physics. NASA later named a telescope after him.

  • School board approves $41 million budget

    The Shelby County School system will spend more than $41 million this year on educating the 6,394 students in the district.

    That means that the budget, which was passed last Thursday night, allocates a little more than $6,500 for the education of each local student.

    This is the biggest budget the board has ever passed.

    For the past two years the board has passed budgets that were expected to take out of the district's saving in order to cover expenses.

    However, each year the actual revenues have exceeded actual expenditures.

  • Economic plunge brings concern

    After the $700 billion financial rescue plan was rejected by the House of Representatives on Monday, the Dow fell nearly 778 points, its worst one-day loss in history.

    Depending on age, occupation and location, people are affected by the struggling economy in different ways.

    However, there was a common sensitivity among many people in downtown Shelbyville on Tuesday morning: concern.

    Like many who worry about bills both today and in the future, Tammy Rannells couldn't narrow down her list of concerns.

  • Teacher accused of hitting student

    An East Middle School teacher has been accused of hitting a male student in the head with a telephone receiver during class.

    According to a press release from the Shelby County Public School system, the teacher, whose name has not been released, allegedly hit the student last Friday after asking him to call his parent(s).

    Superintendent James Neihof said the school system has conducted its own investigation and reported the allegation to the Cabinet for Families and Children, which still is investigating.

  • County imposes burning ban

    Drought conditions are forcing county officials to impose an open burning ban for all county residents, meaning residents may not burn anything outside.

    The order was issued Monday by Shelby County Judge Executive Rob Rothenburger, who said that dry conditions have made it dangerous to start any kind of fire outdoors.

    Mike Callahan, a hydrologist at the National Weather Service, said Shelby County is about 5.2 inches below its normal annual rainfall and that surrounding counties are in similarly dry, though those in Southern Kentucky are worse.

  • Semi flips on I-64; driver injured

    The driver of a tractor-trailer was injured Monday morning when his vehicle overturned on Interstate I-64 West.

    Brian Stradford, 40, of North Carolina, was treated and released from Jewish Hospital Shelbyville for injuries he sustained when his rig left the roadway and turned over on the grass, spilling a full load of scrap metal and rupturing a fuel tank.

    Simpsonville Fire Chief Walter Jones, whose department responded to the accident that happened at the 26-mile marker, said that Haz-Mat teams cleaned up the diesel spill of about 60 gallons.

  • Man charged for pointing gun at his neighbor

    A Bagdad-area man who is the pastor of a church in Louisville was indicted for pointing a loaded gun at his neighbor.

    Richard Miller of Cedarmore Road was indicted Sept. 17 in Shelby County District Court on a charge of second-degree wanton endangerment, a misdemeanor.

    The incident happened on July 24, when Miller allegedly pointed a loaded pistol at Dana Duncan, a next-door neighbor.

    Miller is scheduled to be arraigned in Shelby District Court on Tuesday.

    Miller said Duncan filed charges against him after the altercation.

  • SCHS names new athletics director

    Shelby County High School has named girls' basketball coach Sally Zimmerman the school's new athletics director Friday.

    The change came about when Assistant Principal Don Harding left the school in August to become the principal at the Educational Facility at Cropper. Steve Coleman, then athletics director, replaced Harding at the high school.

    Zimmerman will continue to coach the Lady Rockets this season before finding a replacement next year.

    See the full story in Wednesday's Sentinel-News.