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Local News

  • School board to consider budget

    School board

     

    to consider budget

     

    Tentative plan for next school year

     

    to be presented at meeting Thursday

     

    By Lisa King/Sentinel-News staff writer

     

    The Shelby County Board of Education will consider a tentative budget for the 2009-2010 school year at its next regular board meeting Thursday night.

     

  • Decker to head county GOP

    The county's Republican leaders have chosen Jennifer Decker to head up the local GOP.

    Decker was selected last week to replace Steve Miller, who resigned after taking a job as an aide to Congressman Brett Guthrie. Miller had been party chair for about 18 months.

    As county party chair, Decker will be responsible for recruiting candidates for local office, serving as fundraiser-in-chief for the local party, acting as liaison between the county and state and national GOP and being the spokesperson for the party.

  • Property dispute gets its 3rd judge

    A lawsuit filed by a group of local business people about the sale of a parcel of land they own along the new Shelbyville Bypass is back on the court docket after several months in limbo.

    At dispute are three tracts totaling 72 acres along U.S. 60 and Kentucky 55, west of Shelbyville. The group that owns that property sued Icon Properties, which they say had an agreement to buy the land but didn't complete the deal by its contracted time.

  • Ash borer found in Shelby

    It is usually a good thing when Shelby County finishes first in the state. Not this time.

    The emerald ash borer, a foreign-born insect that is decimating ash trees in the Midwest, was found near Cedarmore in Shelby County last week. That is the first confirmed sighting of the pest in Kentucky. A few days later, the borer was also found in Jessamine County, according to a press release from University of Kentucky entomologists.

  • Cornerstone Christian Academy 2009

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  • Triple S hears concerns with comprehensive plan

    Noting the economic recession, representatives from a trio of local organizations were in attendance to express their concerns at a public hearing Tuesday about the development of Shelby County's new comprehensive plan.

    Their united focus was clear: Let's maintain Shelby County's agricultural base and not overrun it with residential, commercial, or industrial development.

  • Two elementary schools win science awards

     photos submitted

    Simpsonville Elementary's Robotics team finished first at the Student Technology Leadership Program (STLP) championships in Lexington last week. Participating were (left) Ben Loveall, Carter Baralt, Jacob Hershberger and Matthew Hershberger.

     

    Painted Stone Elementary sent 15 students to the STLP state championships in Lexington. The school's Robotics team finished second.

  • Shelbyville's budget remains about the same

    The Shelbyville City Council on Thursday night passed the first reading of the ciyt's budget for 2009-10, and it's not a whole lot different from the current one.

    The budget for the fiscal year starting July 1 carries a balance of $3.5 million, which is about $500,000 more than this year.

    The budget suggests the city will spend at about the same rate as last year, but there are a couple noticeable changes.

  • Escorting the heroes

    The motorcycles were out in full force Tuesday, accompanying the remains of three decorated war veterans to a rest stop in Shelby County, where they took a 5-minute break and picked up locals who joined their brigade,

    Then they hit the road again.

    Destination: Arlington National Cemetery in Virginia.

    David Haynes, Head Ride Captain of the Patriot Guard Riders in Louisville, stood with a hoard of other riders at the rest stop awaiting the arrival of the escort.

  • EARLIER: Martinrea to close in next few weeks

    After a turbulent year of layoffs and cutbacks, Martinrea Heavy Stamping will close its doors, probably next month.

    Plant Manager Shawn Aldesberger confirmed Thursday afternoon that the company will shut down because of what he called "uncompetitive wage rates."

    Aldesberger did not give a definite time frame for the closing, saying only that it "could happen rather quickly, maybe as early as July."