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Local News

  • Triple S approves new satellite dish guidelines

    Picking up where the discussion left off at its October meeting, the Triple S Planning and Zoning Commission approved a new text amendment Tuesday for the Shelby County Zoning Regulations in regards to satellite dishes.

  • Shelby men busted in drug roundups

    Two Shelbyville men have been arrested in a series of drug busts during the past month that has snared about 150 alleged drug users and dealers.

    John Hawkins, 31, was arrested in a bust conducted by Kentucky State Police at their Post 5 location in Carrollton last week. He was charged with second-degree trafficking in a controlled substance.

  • EARLIER: Stumbo faces civil trial

    A 2008 Shelby County High School graduate is suing a former teacher and the staff of three Kentucky school districts, charging they were complicit in sexual harassment and wanton negligence.

    In a lawsuit filed Thursday in Shelby County Circuit Court, Elizabeth Reynolds, 18, has charged former teacher Scott Stumbo with "intentional and outrageous" conduct that has caused her to suffer "severe emotional distress."

    This civil suit comes 10 months after Stumbo submitted an Alford plea to criminal charges of sexual harassment of a student.

  • EARLIER: Leggett & Platt plans huge layoff

    Leggett & Platt plans to lay off 85 workers this fall, according to Libby Adams, executive director of the Shelby County Industrial and Development Foundation.

    Adams said her office just received notice of the layoff on Thursday.

    The Simpsonville plant was forced to reduce its number of employees due to a decrease in the demand for its products, according to a press release from the company's corporate office.

  • EARLIER: Police ask for public's help in solving murder

    Police are offering a reward in seeking the public's help in locating whoever killed a local man in a brutal murder last week.

    James “Jim” Duckett, 43, was found murdered  Nov. 10, at his home at 5300 Rockbridge Road  by a relative who had stopped in to check on him after he had not been seen all weekend.

  • EARLIER: Helping Hand closes

    Shelby County Helping Hand has discontinued helping the needy in Shelby County.

    The charity, after 21 years of assistance with rent, utilities and food, is responding to the national economic downturn and current financial crush of many small business and charities.

    "We are no longer receiving [enough] funding from churches and businesses," Chairman, Sylvia Marshall said.

    Marshall said the donations available to disperse have decreased since the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001.

  • Jail house rock solid in Shelby

    Staff photo by Lisa King

    Lt. Tony Aldridge watches as Deputy Jailer Darrell Cox manns the board in the control room at the Shelby County Detention Center.

    Jail house rock solid in Shelby

    Inmate numbers high; staff coping well

    By Lisa King/Sentinel-News staff writer

    Is the Shelby County Jail  overcrowded?

    Yes and no, according to jailer Bobby Waits.

  • Helping the helpers

    John Sherman Clark makes the bands that hold Dean's Milk containers together when they ship. He gets up in the morning excited to work, to contribute to society like thousands of others in the city.

    But what sets him apart are the obstacles he has to overcome to do it all. Clark has Down syndrome and lost his sight in 2003.

  • EARLIER: Serial arsonist arrested for setting 9 fires

    James Aaron Clark, 27, of Shelbyville, was arrested Wednesday on nine arson-related charges, after admitting that he set the fires as a way to relieve stress.

    Shelby County Sheriff's Detective Jason Rice said that Clark is charged with one count of first-degree arson, a felony that carries a penalty of 20 years to life, three counts of second-degree arson, also a felony, and seven counts of criminal mischief related to the fires in Shelby and Henry counties.

  • Board to discuss redistricting plans

    Lora Floyd is still hoping her children won’t be sent to a different school next year.

    Floyd, who has a kindergartener and second-grader at Simpsonville Elementary School, is one of the 35 local parents who were notified last month that their child might be redistricted to Southside Elementary School because of overcrowding at Simpsonville.

    The proposed redistricting, which will effect close to 60 children, would take effect next school year.