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Local News

  • EARLIER: New concept presented for new school

    The Shelby County School Board is considering a brand new concept for how it might use the new secondary school it is building west of Shelbyville.

    At a board meeting Thursday, Superintendent James Neihof outlined tentative plans and called for public hearings on a concept that would have two 5-year high schools in the county: one at Shelby County High School and the other on this new property.

  • County officials hope stimulus dollars will help projects

    Leaders in Shelby County are hopeful that the $3.2 billion allotted to the state by President Obama’s stimulus package will provide dollars for several planned local projects.

    Obama’s American Recovery and Reinvestment Act is spreading dollars to states to help develop economic recovery and preserve health care, education and other opportunities to create jobs.

    Gov. Steve Beshear on Wednesday announced his “Kentucky At Work” initiative to use those dollars during the next 28 months to help preserve jobs and grow the economy.

  • EARLIER: New school to be named after Martha Layne Collins

    Shelby County's new secondary school will be named for after former Kentucky Gov. Martha Layne Collins.

    The school board on Thursday night approved this honor for Collins, the only woman to be governor. She is a Bagdad native who graduated from Shelbyville and a former teacher.

    Collins became governor in 1983, serving one term, before getting involved in education reform and economic development by serving in various education-based roles. Since 1998, she has been executive scholar-in-residence at Georgetown College.

  • EARLIER: FDA grants extension on dead-animal removal

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) last week granted a 60-day extension of its regulation requiring the removal of brain and spinal-cord tissue from cattle more than 30 months of age before they can be rendered for animal feed.

    The extension comes after Kentucky's Congressional delegation delivered a letter to the FDA asking for the reprieve.

    But the extension does not mean the rule will likely be rescinded, said Nate Hodson, a spokesperson for Congressman Brett Guthrie.

  • Local road projects funded to get going

    Though legislators spent much of the last session of the General Assembly finding ways to pinch pennies, they found enough cash in state coffers to fund several local road projects.

    For the next fiscal year, which begins July 1, the state has set aside $6.3 million to fund three highway projects here:

    • $4.4 million to buy rights of way and utility construction for the widening of Ky. 1848 (Buck Creek Road) from I-64 to U. S. 60.

    • $1 million for the design phase of widening Ky. 53 (Mount Eden Road) from I-64 to U. S. 60

  • Nation Bros. closes shop

     

     Nation Bros., which has had the grim job of removing dead livestock from the county's farms for 24 years, is out of business, owner Gabe Nation said.

    His family business is a casualty of an FDA regulation, set to go into effect this month, which requires the removal of brain and spinal cord tissues from cattle more than 30 months of age before they are rendered into pet or livestock feed. Nation said the rule would double his cost of doing business, and many of the 22 counties his company served could not meet the increase.

  • A kick in the butt

    What seems like a cruel April Fool’s Day prank for smokers is actually a harsh reality today as the single largest federal tobacco tax increase ever has combined with a state tobacco tax hike to send  prices skyrocketing.

    The federal tax on a pack of cigarettes jumped 62 cents today, and the state tax doubled from 30 cents to 60 cents.

    The result is a 92-cent increase per pack, which translates to cartons of cigarettes costing around $10 more in the Commonwealth.

  • New school, mixed reviews

    The second of two public forums to hear comment on the proposed use of the new secondary school under construction was held Monday night at West Middle School.

    The option under consideration is to change the organizational plan to create two high schools in the district, with both Shelby County High School and the new Martha Layne Collins High School proposed to house Grades 8 and 9 on the second floor and Grades 10 through 12 on the main floor.

  • Letter to parents has not been sent

    When students went home on Friday, they took a letter to their parents explaining the school board's proposal to switch the operation of after-school programs to the Franklin County YMCA.

    This letter was drawn up in response to a large crowd of angry parents who showed up at the school board meeting at Heritage Elementary on Thursday night to blast the board for attempting to approve the proposal without informing them first.

    Superintendent James Neihof apologized for the oversight, and the board voted to table the matter until it could be explained to parents.

  • Letter sent home to parents on Tuesday

    In a school board meeting last Thursday, Superintendent James Niehof promised parents a letter explaining the status of the after-school program.

    As of Monday afternoon numerous parents called the newspaper when their children got home from school to say they had not received the letter.

    In response, Duanne Puckett, community relations coordinator, said that when she was talking about the letter last Friday, she meant that she was working on it.

    "The letter had to be drafted with the YMCA's input," she said.