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Local News

  • EARLIER: Casey placed on respirator

    Family members remained hopeful Thursday that Mike Casey could pull through the overtime game he is playing against heart disease.

    Casey, the former Shelby County and University of Kentucky basketball star, gave everyone a scare early Thursday when he stopped breathing. Doctors at Vanderbilt University Medical Center placed him on a ventilator.

    On Thursday afternoon he was resting peacefully, having been sedated because of the discomfort caused by the breathing tube in his throat.

  • Stumbo's suit against school board dismissed

    Shelby County Circuit Judge Charles Hickman has dismissed a suit brought against the school board by a fired former teacher who was trying to regain access to school grounds so he could attend his daughter's activities.

    Scott Stumbo, a former Shelby County High School teacher, was banned from school grounds in February 2007 after being fired for allegedly sexually harassing a student in 2006.

    Stumbo was indicted on charges of distribution of obscene material to a minor. He submitted an Alford Plea and was sentenced to 180 days in jail, probated for 24 months.

  • EARLIER: Delegation lobbies Congress on dead animal removal

    Kentucky's county leaders took the issue of dead animal disposal to the halls of Congress last week in an effort to get at least a delay in an FDA regulation that, at least temporarily, has shut down local farmers' ability to remove large animals that die on their farms.

    Representatives from the Kentucky Association of Counties (KACo) met with Sen. Mitch McConnell and Congressmen Brett Guthrie, Hal Rogers, Ed Whitfield and a staff member from Congressman Ben Chandler's office. The KACo delegation included Shelby County Magistrate Tony Carriss.

  • EARLIER: New concept presented for new school

    The Shelby County School Board is considering a brand new concept for how it might use the new secondary school it is building west of Shelbyville.

    At a board meeting Thursday, Superintendent James Neihof outlined tentative plans and called for public hearings on a concept that would have two 5-year high schools in the county: one at Shelby County High School and the other on this new property.

  • County officials hope stimulus dollars will help projects

    Leaders in Shelby County are hopeful that the $3.2 billion allotted to the state by President Obama’s stimulus package will provide dollars for several planned local projects.

    Obama’s American Recovery and Reinvestment Act is spreading dollars to states to help develop economic recovery and preserve health care, education and other opportunities to create jobs.

    Gov. Steve Beshear on Wednesday announced his “Kentucky At Work” initiative to use those dollars during the next 28 months to help preserve jobs and grow the economy.

  • EARLIER: New school to be named after Martha Layne Collins

    Shelby County's new secondary school will be named for after former Kentucky Gov. Martha Layne Collins.

    The school board on Thursday night approved this honor for Collins, the only woman to be governor. She is a Bagdad native who graduated from Shelbyville and a former teacher.

    Collins became governor in 1983, serving one term, before getting involved in education reform and economic development by serving in various education-based roles. Since 1998, she has been executive scholar-in-residence at Georgetown College.

  • EARLIER: FDA grants extension on dead-animal removal

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) last week granted a 60-day extension of its regulation requiring the removal of brain and spinal-cord tissue from cattle more than 30 months of age before they can be rendered for animal feed.

    The extension comes after Kentucky's Congressional delegation delivered a letter to the FDA asking for the reprieve.

    But the extension does not mean the rule will likely be rescinded, said Nate Hodson, a spokesperson for Congressman Brett Guthrie.

  • Local road projects funded to get going

    Though legislators spent much of the last session of the General Assembly finding ways to pinch pennies, they found enough cash in state coffers to fund several local road projects.

    For the next fiscal year, which begins July 1, the state has set aside $6.3 million to fund three highway projects here:

    • $4.4 million to buy rights of way and utility construction for the widening of Ky. 1848 (Buck Creek Road) from I-64 to U. S. 60.

    • $1 million for the design phase of widening Ky. 53 (Mount Eden Road) from I-64 to U. S. 60

  • Nation Bros. closes shop

     

     Nation Bros., which has had the grim job of removing dead livestock from the county's farms for 24 years, is out of business, owner Gabe Nation said.

    His family business is a casualty of an FDA regulation, set to go into effect this month, which requires the removal of brain and spinal cord tissues from cattle more than 30 months of age before they are rendered into pet or livestock feed. Nation said the rule would double his cost of doing business, and many of the 22 counties his company served could not meet the increase.

  • A kick in the butt

    What seems like a cruel April Fool’s Day prank for smokers is actually a harsh reality today as the single largest federal tobacco tax increase ever has combined with a state tobacco tax hike to send  prices skyrocketing.

    The federal tax on a pack of cigarettes jumped 62 cents today, and the state tax doubled from 30 cents to 60 cents.

    The result is a 92-cent increase per pack, which translates to cartons of cigarettes costing around $10 more in the Commonwealth.